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Offline simonlock

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« on: November 14, 2009, 06:07:47 PM »
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« Last Edit: December 02, 2009, 02:30:17 AM by simonlock »
 

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Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2009, 06:26:44 PM »
I don't play out, but even just casually jamming with some other klutzes I've noticed that my left hand just aches after an hour or so from gripping the guitar way too hard. Nervousness. A public gig would probably cramp up the whole arm in 15 minutes or so.
Parkers: Pick, cap, T-shirt, clock, and other assorted accouterments

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Offline spider

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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2009, 07:48:10 PM »
All stamina.....I've done 200+ a year for the last 25 years and it's mostly your liver that takes the beating. Now I notice it's my feet that hurt after a gig...or during...or even before!
08 Parker Fly Deluxe in Galaxy Grey
And a bunch of other guitars that aren't getting played any more...

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2009, 09:32:18 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by simonlock

So, the only way it gets easier is to do it. Lol like anything I guess.



I think that's true.  Just like exercising any other muscle, you get in shape and you can do more over time.  It used to take me a week to get my voice in shape.  And as you're in front of an audience more, you relax.[:)]
 

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Offline gtrbmart

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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2009, 10:38:47 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by spider

All stamina.....I've done 200+ a year for the last 25 years and it's mostly your liver that takes the beating. Now I notice it's my feet that hurt after a gig...or during...or even before!



Play barefoot! [8D]

I used to play with a very intense band.  Lots of fun but boy was it tiring.  Back then I used my 13lb Schecter and that sucked.  Playing standing up with my Deluxe has been a piece of cake so far though I haven't taken it live yet.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2009, 10:40:20 PM by gtrbmart »
 

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Offline spider

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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2009, 10:55:45 PM »
You learn how to coast through some of the gigs after a while. I played a two set reception gig this afternoon in Calgary for the Gemini Awards and the load in and out was more memorable!
That and the hospitality suite for the band! I can tell you exactly how many and what kind of sandwiches were on the platter but I could maybe only name three or four of the songs we played.....
08 Parker Fly Deluxe in Galaxy Grey
And a bunch of other guitars that aren't getting played any more...

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Offline Bill

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« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2009, 08:48:25 AM »
I have been slowly playing more in front of people.

It is waaaay harder for me. For others its no biggie at all.

It really makes me mad that I can't relax enough to sound normal.

The guitar playing is not effected as bad as the voice.

You wouldn't know it now but I was a fairly shy and introverted youth and when it comes to singing in public I revert right back there.

Any tips on how to get your voice to relax when you are nervous?

A few Flys in my soup
A few Flys in my soup

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Offline mountaindewaddict

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« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2009, 09:31:23 AM »
Bill, as someone who speaks in front of about 700 people every week, there's no one perfect way that works for everyone.  Most techniques that help you relax in general help.  

Singing is different that speaking, I know (having done both), but I've found the greatest way to be relaxed singing (or playing for that matter) is preparedness.  If you know every note by heart, it's easier to get up there and go for it.  That and just doing it more... that's the hard part - much more so than preparing like crazy.

Casey

Gear: Parker Fly Deluxe (in Ruby Red), Digitech GNX4, other stuff...
God Bless!
Casey

Gear: Parker Fly Deluxe, Parker PDF60, Way Huge, Digitech / Hardwire, Line 6, Source Audio,T-Rex, and TC Electronic Pedals, Egnater amps, other stuff... God Bless!

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Offline spider

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« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2009, 10:20:12 AM »
Casey is right Bill. Also remember one minute on stage is worth one hour in the basement! I don't know where you live but there seems to be an open stage or a jam every night where I'm from and they are a great way to get experience and test your progress. If there isn't one...start one!
It is my experience that most musicians/singers are in fact very shy people and it is only through music and performance that they can open up and be themselves! I know it's true for me...
08 Parker Fly Deluxe in Galaxy Grey
And a bunch of other guitars that aren't getting played any more...

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2009, 10:58:57 AM »
Bill.... Just to play devil's advocate here.  Try inderal.  It's a beta blocker used by many classical musicians to calm them down.  For me, guitar was never a problem, but performing as a classical pianist made me nervous.  I'd practice my butt off, I'd know the music backwards and forwards, but when I sat at the piano I could see my hands shake.  Inderal took the shakes away and calmed me down.  Now, people may respond less than enthusiastically to this post, but I can tell you as a person who's done every type of performing, it's worth looking into.

http://www.partialobserver.com/article.cfm?id=1251
 

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Offline spider

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« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2009, 01:35:03 PM »
Huge can of worms...That is a very good article on the subject. I however can tell you that at your level I think it will be far more rewarding to learn how to deal with your stage fright than to bury it with medication....I worked for a couple of years with a very popular Canadian singer/songwriter who would frequently throw up before a show until he learned to use the nervous energy to his advantage!
Instead of trying to hide it we would address it directly, on stage, in front of the audience. Just the act of saying out loud "Wow, there are a lot of people here" lets the audience share in your mood and lets you access their energy as well!
An audience is NEVER there hoping to see you fail.
I can't speak for classical or competitive situations...I guess whatever works but just know that ALL drugs will, even if they are not addictive per se, create a dependency and ALL drugs will eventually let you down. Period.
 If you do want to try Inderal give it say a month and then try performing without it, if you are back where you started then the drug didn't help you with your stage fright.
08 Parker Fly Deluxe in Galaxy Grey
And a bunch of other guitars that aren't getting played any more...

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2009, 04:14:52 PM »
I wouldn't recommend any drugs for people who gig on a regular basis.  But if you do, say,  5 gigs a year, inderal won't have any lasting effect on you.  I've played live for over 40 years, many times for over 100,000 people a week, and out of all the concerts I've played, I've used inderal about 10 times.  All when playing classical music. The amount used is about 1/20th of what people with high blood pressure use daily.  Spider, I agree with you.  I wouldn't want to use any drug on a regular basis, unless it was medically necessary.  But for the infrequent gig, if a beta blocker will make you comfortable, I think it's fine.  In fact, the person who prescribed it for me was a classical pianist, and a doctor:)
I think anyone that gigs all of the time, just gets over the stage fright and doesn't need drugs.
 

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Offline spider

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« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2009, 05:06:40 PM »
There ya go Bill! I don't think anything will beat just plain getting out there and playing and singing as much as you can......You are going to suck once in a while but you learn so much by making a mistake. Those lessons can't be taught by a teacher. It might not hurt to take a few voice lessons. I'm not a natural singer but many years ago I took about 6 lessons with a vocal coach and they really helped! Apparently I didn't know how to breath:)
  To be nervous is normal. I am subbing on a gig tomorrow night for a friend (and big influence) of mine and it is a little out of my comfort zone (celtic gig,on bass) and frankly I could tank it but I won't because I've been working on the material all darn day! Plus it's the sort of gig that will require me to have at least one or two pints of confidence!
So ignore my "just say no" rant! LOL!
08 Parker Fly Deluxe in Galaxy Grey
And a bunch of other guitars that aren't getting played any more...

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Offline doombilly

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« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2009, 05:08:49 PM »
Moving the 800 lbs of gear to fuel an ILLICITIZEN show ugh... Let's don't get physical and say we did. :)

http://illicitizen.com

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Offline Mr. Wonderful

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« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2009, 07:59:11 PM »
here's what I do, Mr. Wonderful is my alter ego, he's the buddy love to ward's professor klump.  I've simply built a fake person that I can step into and walk out on stage with. it works very well for me, and my other band members have their own alter egos they use now. it's easier when it's not you out there with your **** in the wind.   and as ben affleck said in boiler room:  if you have to pretend you have a 10 inch ****, whatever it takes!     don't ever take anyone's advise to "be yourself", unless, of course, you're jimmy page.

www.myspace.com/justaddwaterduo
 the , "weddings during wartime" and "baby baby" were both recorded with one of my pm 20's
p 38 black w/pearloid (named pearl), pm 20 in bubinga (3+3, named bubba), pm 20 tangerine (hockey stick, named crush)
www.myspace.com/justaddwaterduo
 the , "weddings during wartime" and "baby baby" were both recorded with one of my pm 20's
p 38 black w/pearloid (named pearl), pm 20 in bubinga (3+3, named bubba), pm 20 tangerine (hockey stick, named crush)