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Author Topic: A parker guitar for jazz, please  (Read 11380 times)

Offline quakenut

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #30 on: October 15, 2005, 11:09:07 AM »
quote:
I know a few extremely talented guitar players (and other types of musicians) who were playing professionally for a while (up to 10 years +), but their finances were from day to day and they finally got tired of living that way...


Indeed. Show me the money!!
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline Paul Marossy

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #31 on: October 15, 2005, 01:26:47 PM »
Yeah, I prefer financial security over starving. [:D]

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A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline loumt123

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #32 on: October 15, 2005, 04:56:22 PM »
I am a bit confused on how you are relating the melodic minor scale to the II V I progression in C, but I guess it will come in time, i suppose i haven't reached that level yet, or i dont understand entirely how it is theoretically working in the progression, but i'll figure it out someday. But does anyone know some common variations of the modes like, you said, the G dorian b2. I know there are a bunch of crazy ones. And, if you were struggling as a professional musician, why not just consider becoming a teacher on the side or something..you certainly have the knowledge.
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline quakenut

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #33 on: October 15, 2005, 07:17:59 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by cmpkllyrslf96

I am a bit confused on how you are relating the melodic minor scale to the II V I progression in C, but I guess it will come in time, i suppose i haven't reached that level yet, or i dont understand entirely how it is theoretically working in the progression, but i'll figure it out someday. But does anyone know some common variations of the modes like, you said, the G dorian b2. I know there are a bunch of crazy ones. And, if you were struggling as a professional musician, why not just consider becoming a teacher on the side or something..you certainly have the knowledge.



The use of the melodic minor scale in jazz is mostly to provide chord substitution sounds for the Dom7 via the scale route. Let’s take that II V I progression in the key of C Major: You can solo just using the C Major scale for all three chords, but that’s not very interesting. Injecting a mode of the melodic minor for the V chord can force tension by adding extensions/altered chord sounds to your solo. The G Dorian b2 is:

G Ab Bb C D E F G

The Ab suggest G7b9 chord and the Bb suggests G7#9. The rest of the notes (G C D E F) are found in the C major scale/G Mixolydian. Therefore you’ve added altered dominant sounds amongst the C Major sounds, which provide the necessary tension and interest. There are more interesting things you can do with the II and I chords as well but that goes beyond my point.

Using a metronome set to about 88 and a tape recorder, play a few rounds of II V I in 4/4 time, one chord per measure. Play it back and solo in C major for the II and I chord, use G Dorian b2 (which is also F melodic minor) on the V chord for some cool G7b9 and G7#9 sounds in your solo.
__________________________________________

As for your other question, I suppose I just burned out. Music had become more of a hobby, not something I wanted to live my life by daily in that capacity.
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline loumt123

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #34 on: October 15, 2005, 07:51:28 PM »
Ahhh that helped alot im starting to make connections.
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline quakenut

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #35 on: October 15, 2005, 08:17:09 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by cmpkllyrslf96

Ahhh that helped alot im starting to make connections.



Thumbs up. [:)]

« Last Edit: October 15, 2005, 09:31:10 PM by quakenut »
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline quakenut

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #36 on: October 15, 2005, 09:31:33 PM »
Oops, I made a little mistake. If you do the recording, play the I chord for two measures, the II and the V chord for one measure each.
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline loumt123

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2005, 07:13:14 AM »
i picked that up, it didnt sound right with the one chord for one measure only. I can definately hear the tension.
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline quakenut

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #38 on: October 16, 2005, 07:43:49 AM »
Cool. The Super Locrian will perform the same function in that progression but provides even more tension (adds b5 and #5 to the existing b9/#9) for the V chord. Play G Super Locrian on the V chord.

G Super Locrian: G Ab Bb B Db Eb F G
(Which are the same notes as G# melodic minor)

« Last Edit: October 16, 2005, 02:03:06 PM by quakenut »
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline trap

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #39 on: October 17, 2005, 05:29:34 PM »
hi, try the books by saxaphonist dave liebman for some truly out material. as for guitars ,i owned a parker jazz for about 2 years and now i have the mojo flame.the mojo is a better sounding guitar in general.jazz included.and i am mainly a jazz player. it's darker and warmer than the jazz.
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline quakenut

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2005, 12:53:40 AM »
Yeah, I've not tried other Parkers, but I too can say the Mojo has a nice deep resonance...not lacking at all in the jazz department.

Dave Liebman eh? Gonna try to find some of that.
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline baronthecat

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #41 on: December 04, 2005, 10:45:15 AM »

 I was hoping for a Fly Artist with a floating "jazz" pickup in the neck position. Or maybe a Nitefly (with 24!!!! frets) hollowbody. That would sound nice and jazzy. You could pretend to be Jim Hall all night.
2005 Parker Fly Classic, transparent cherry.
2006 Parker Fly Custom, majik blue.

 You could spend forever picking the right amp for each string.

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline loumt123

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #42 on: December 04, 2005, 12:03:08 PM »
hmm thats the first time ive heard of a floating pickup idea for a parker..that certainly would be interesting...
 

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline baronthecat

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #43 on: December 13, 2005, 12:20:36 PM »

 A floating pickup would probably be tough since there is no pickguard to mount the pickup. And mounting to the fretboard would be bad because removing the pickup for any reason would be labor-intensive. Maybe a soapbar pickup (bridge only). How about some art-deco style paintjob as well...

Taylor 810CE
Warwick Thumb 5
soon:Parker Fly Custom
2005 Parker Fly Classic, transparent cherry.
2006 Parker Fly Custom, majik blue.

 You could spend forever picking the right amp for each string.

A parker guitar for jazz, please

Offline trap

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A parker guitar for jazz, please
« Reply #44 on: December 13, 2005, 01:58:03 PM »
ok here's my jazz fly concept: mahogany body and neck,one sd jazz pup in the neck,splittable, and a wood bridge assembly with a piezo.like the spanish fly bridge but instead of a bone saddle,a wood one.oh yeah,a tone control on the piezo.