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Author Topic: sweep picking  (Read 6134 times)

Offline Twanking45

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sweep picking
« on: March 20, 2010, 05:31:48 PM »
I've been playing for 20 years and have never learned sweep picking. I've decided to teach myself. Does anyone have any tips or know of a YouTube video that demonstrates the right way to start? apparently there are several styles of the technique. Any help is appreciated. Thanks

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sweep picking

Offline mountaindewaddict

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sweep picking
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2010, 07:51:27 PM »
Twank, Frank Gambale is regarded by many to be the master.  Search for his stuff on YouTube. [:)]

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sweep picking

Offline MegaDroogie666

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sweep picking
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2010, 08:16:51 PM »
There's that rock discipline video by johnn pettrucci floating around on youtube. Its a good start because it works your right hand and that's the essence of the sweep. But then again I wouldn't recommend it for left hand work. I'd probably try searching youtube after looking at the pertucci vids. Hope that helps dude.

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sweep picking

Offline PatricBrown

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sweep picking
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2010, 10:51:56 AM »
5 strings. No low E. In D, you know how you can make a barre D chord at 5th fret low A string with 1st finger barring the 5th fret, and the 2nd finger barring three strings(D,G,B) at the 7th fret. Now, start the sweep on the low A where you're playing the low D note,,,(hold the barre with the 1st finger through this,,sometimes I don't think I'm really holding the barre so much as making sure my 1st finger is in those two places when it needs to be,,but the 2nd finger remained barred), hammer with your little finger to the F#(3rd) on the A string, and come down sweeping across the three, D.G.and B strings barred by the 2nd finger, sweep the 1st string which is being barred by 1st finger, and hammer to the C#, 9th fret(major 7th) with your little finger, and then change pick direction, starting on the high E string(barred by 1st finger at 5th fret so that it's playing an A note), and sweep back down to where you will have your little finger moved into place on that F# note on the A string, pull that off, and start over and repeat ad infinitum(nauseam?). That's not a hard sweep, but gets you started into the idea of what it is. Too much of a stretch? Move the whole show up into a higher key some frets, of your choice, up.

Correction, I AM moving my 2nd finger out of the way when on the high E. Sorry,,,I was just doing it, and noticed.

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« Last Edit: September 12, 2010, 12:06:57 PM by PatricBrown »
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sweep picking

Offline mojotron

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sweep picking
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2010, 11:14:02 AM »
Simon Lock (simonlock) pointed out Carl Culpepper's book "Terrifying Technique for Guitar" when I asked a similar question a while back - it's cheap and does a good job of pointing out a lot of the techniques that go along with sweep picking. Basically, he points out sweeps in the "c" (root, third, fifth) form of a chord on 5 strings. The cool thing about the "c" form is that with the simpler forms sweeps you end up with one finger per note and that really helps develop the right hand technique IMO.

One can take that inversion and play major/minor/diminished sweep forms (really just arpeggios that allow you to play one/two notes a string) of root, 3rd, 5th..... (R35th) all over the neck. As an exercise, I kind of like taking the key of C playing the R35th sweeps staring with an F-major starting at the 5th position, then G-major starting at the 7th position, then a-minor staring at the 9th position then a b-dim sewwp, C-major... all the way to another F-major sweep at the 17th position - forward/backwards/every-other then play II-V-I-IV-vii-I progressions using the same R35th forms in one key. Then you can play with stuff like doing a II-V... progression and modulate to the key of G or F when you get to the root chord.... that'll keep me busy for hours.  

Here is the form of the R35th sweep at the 5th position:
e-----5-8-------------
b----6---6------------
g---5------5----------
d--7--------7---------
a-8----------8--------
E---------------------

I think sweeping is more about the ability to keep the right hand moving smoothly over sets of strings in kind of a mini strum rather than treating any single string as if you were picking the note: While the left hand technique looks/seems impressive, in videos watch the right hand - that's the key to sweeping.

Also, sweeping has a lot of rolling of the fingers for some chordal forms. When one does a roll, you have to do it in a when where you mute each note after you play it - that's not that easy, so chord forms like the "a" form that is pointed out above are really tough to play cleanly, and it's all about playing only what one can play cleanly - where someone is only playing one note at a time even though they are playing sweeps quickly. Practice with a metronome, going really really slow - until you can play a sweep perfectly, then speed it up slowly in successive practice sessions and you will get there: It requires lots of patience and perfect technique. IMO, it's like any speed technique - if one does not master the technique playing slow it will sound awful at faster speeds. I think a lot of people want to get fast quickly, and that only works with tapping, sweeps and scales require near perfect technique at slow speeds first.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2010, 12:03:02 PM by mojotron »
 

sweep picking

Offline www_Ps_com

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sweep picking
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2010, 11:25:10 AM »
Expect to pratice around 10000 repetitions until you've got a somewhat decent mid-tempo sweet down. IMHO it takes the same amount of time as getting alternate picking down - it's a matter of years.
 

sweep picking

Offline mojotron

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sweep picking
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2010, 11:30:00 AM »
When I started trying to figure out sweeps, I actually really got into learning chordal inversions as well as the extended forms. I'm OK, not great, at sweeps, but it taught me a lot about chordal forms that I use all the time now. For that one reason I think it's great to study sweeps.
 

sweep picking

Offline tjpick

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sweep picking
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2010, 11:32:55 AM »
Frank gambale without doubt-----great lessons----cover of vhs or cd shows frank playing a yellow ibanez---be prepared for some serious shedding
 

sweep picking

Offline Paul Marossy

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sweep picking
« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2010, 08:46:37 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by tjpick

Frank gambale without doubt-----great lessons----cover of vhs or cd shows frank playing a yellow ibanez---be prepared for some serious shedding



Yeah, he is quite the sweeper. But he has a different technique than everyone else. His approach makes more sense to me.

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Offline mojotron

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« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2010, 11:38:01 PM »
I'm not sure if Frank Gambale's technique is really different as much as just more advanced. He uses finger-rolls and more elaborate asymmetric right-hand picking as well as spreading out the left-hand a bit more, but that's advanced stuff that I think would frustrate people that have not mastered simpler stuff first. The simpler sweeps are the best one's to start with IMO. Of course, if someone has not mastered scales and chords start there....
 

sweep picking

Offline www_Ps_com

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sweep picking
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2010, 02:04:29 AM »
Gambale uses economy picking (mini-sweeps when crossing strings) as an alternative to alternate picking. To make this work with certain scales he uses some different fingerings. Opposed to this the usual player does straight alternate picking for runs and only switches to SP when soloing, then typically sweeping 3 or more strings.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2010, 02:07:59 AM by www_Ps_com »
 

sweep picking

Offline rollingthunder

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sweep picking
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2010, 06:59:43 AM »
I just got back into playing this past year after a 10+ year hiatus. Long story; anyway...

( One of the sparks that has motivated me was getting a Mojo, btw. )

I decided I wanted to learn sweep picking as well, and have spent a little time searching for exercises. I ran across these exercises and found some of them pretty good to get started:

http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/2010/daniel-owen-1.html
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Kopyto/tom-kopyto-sweep-picking-licks.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Matt%20Hale/matt-hale3.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Fareri/f_fareri2.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Fareri/f_fareri3.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Campese/m_campese3.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/OTHER/paco-hernandez.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/OTHER/ludovico-reale.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/OTHER/k_johansson.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Roo/sweep-picking-video.htm

All the lessons:
http://www.shredacademy.com/content/tlessons.php

Also these:

http://www.insaneguitar.com/mc/sweeping.html
http://gosk.com/arpeggios/

The main thing, as with all technique, is to be patient and to set your expectations: it takes time.
Practice these things with a metronome at very slow speeds. As has been noted after many, many practice sessions, you will get these together at a medium speed.
Learning the muting and finger rolling is key as well - things already mentioned.

I'm starting to get to that point, but still have a long way to go. My goal is to have this technique together by the end of 2011.

I think the challenge is to use them in a musical way, and like others have mentioned, that comes from understanding the chord forms and progressions.

One thing I note is every video you see emphasizes playing these with a great metal sound. I practice these clean, plugged in or not all the time: if these sound good clean, then they will sound crisp when played dirty.

I have the Gambale book, or one of them, sitting in a box in the basement. doh...I'm thinking I need to get a new copy..that's over 15 years old now, I think.

Now I'm going to look up the references from the other posts.


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sweep picking

Offline mojotron

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sweep picking
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2010, 09:15:32 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by rollingthunder...
I decided I wanted to learn sweep picking as well, and have spent a little time searching for exercises. I ran across these exercises and found some of them pretty good to get started:

http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/2010/daniel-owen-1.html
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Kopyto/tom-kopyto-sweep-picking-licks.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Matt%20Hale/matt-hale3.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Fareri/f_fareri2.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Fareri/f_fareri3.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Campese/m_campese3.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/OTHER/paco-hernandez.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/OTHER/ludovico-reale.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/OTHER/k_johansson.htm
http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/Roo/sweep-picking-video.htm

All the lessons:
http://www.shredacademy.com/content/tlessons.php

Also these:

http://www.insaneguitar.com/mc/sweeping.html
http://gosk.com/arpeggios/

The main thing, as with all technique, is to be patient and to set your expectations: it takes time.
Practice these things with a metronome at very slow speeds. As has been noted after many, many practice sessions, you will get these together at a medium speed.
Learning the muting and finger rolling is key as well - things already mentioned.

I'm starting to get to that point, but still have a long way to go. My goal is to have this technique together by the end of 2011.

I think the challenge is to use them in a musical way, and like others have mentioned, that comes from understanding the chord forms and progressions.

One thing I note is every video you see emphasizes playing these with a great metal sound. I practice these clean, plugged in or not all the time: if these sound good clean, then they will sound crisp when played dirty.
...

Hey Bill thanks for posting these - some of these are awesome. I agree with what you say about the clean playing and musicallity - I don't play metal but I see some great potential to use sweeps as players in the past have used arpeggios over chord changes. Thanks!
 

sweep picking

Offline David Tomkins

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sweep picking
« Reply #13 on: December 08, 2010, 07:13:15 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by rollingthunder
One thing I note is every video you see emphasizes playing these with a great metal sound. I practice these clean, plugged in or not all the time: if these sound good clean, then they will sound crisp when played dirty.



sorry, i don't agree.  I can play clean sweeps with a clean sound, but adding distortion/gain highlights my sloppy muting techniques and i get all sorts of scrapes and ringing notes.  If you're gonna play them dirty, you gotta practise them dirty.  Playing them clean all the time will fool you into thinking you are playing more cleanly than you actually are.
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sweep picking

Offline rollingthunder

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sweep picking
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2010, 11:18:10 AM »
I see your point, David. I hadn't looked at it that way. For myself, the clean practice translates into clean dirty sound, but perhaps I've fooled myself as I play dirty all the time, but practice more clean than not. Meaning I'm learning clean, but applying dirty, so perhaps I'm correcting the issues you note as I play with the dirty sound. Interesting - I'll have to pay more attention now.


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- bill

2010 Fly Mojo Cherry Flame
1989 Steinberger GM4T
Ibanez RGA8 with Aftermaths
Line 6 Spider MKII w/ shortboard