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Author Topic: Lefty Parkers for all!!!  (Read 12284 times)

Offline Paul Marossy

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!
« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2012, 05:13:40 PM »
There's more to it than just having a left handed bridge made, but that seems to be the biggest most cost prohibitive factor. They also would need to have left-handed versions of the composite material that goes on the back as well as programming the CNC machine to do a lefty body and neck. Otherwise the process of building a Fly is much the same between standard or theoritical left hand models.

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!

Offline billy

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!
« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2012, 07:03:29 PM »
Not exactly,  The main issue is the fixturing involved (&costs) second is the cost of a mold to cast the bridge.  Add the engineering time in to support those issues plus the  cnc work, no way you can do it and meets your costs with the relatively small market.

Same reason there's no 24.75 scale fly, minus the bridge which could be the same.

Wish it was otherwise.

Small consolation, but I thought I saw some pm20 leftys on eBay not long ago.
Billy

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!

Offline Paul Marossy

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!
« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2012, 08:35:06 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by billy

Not exactly,  The main issue is the fixturing involved (&costs) second is the cost of a mold to cast the bridge.  Add the engineering time in to support those issues plus the  cnc work, no way you can do it and meets your costs with the relatively small market.


Well yeah, the fixturing is obviously part of the picture, just didn't think to mention that. Are molds really that expensive? Seems like they could something like that with a CNC milling machine. But I really don't know anything about that subject...

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!

Offline billy

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!
« Reply #33 on: June 09, 2012, 07:49:44 AM »
Yeah, a fly has a few more fixtures involved, including inside the cnc.  Cnc is a great time saver once its set up and proven to be repeatable, but there's a bit of front end CAD/CAM work involved, probably a few days for each part, more if there wasn't the right hand version already.  We've got two CNC machines in our shop and I'm always surprised at how much extra setup time is involved for even simple parts.

The fixtures are not cheap because they are custom, have some tight tolerances, and have to hold up over time.  A fixture like those required is likely $5-10k ea, plus a new bridge mold (or cnc them individually).  So obviously fixtures are required, but considering everything, it's probably by my very rough, outside looking in estimate, at least $50k by time things are done.  Not trivial for a small brand, to say the least!

So if you made 10 lefty flies, it would need to cost probably an extra $5k min per guitar just to break even.  At that price I really doubt there is a market to justify the development time and expense, especially considering the limited resources available at USM at the moment.  Maybe I'm wrong about the demand but given the likely margin, any brand would put their resources on something with bigger, repeatable margins.
Billy

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!

Offline bno

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Lefty Parkers for all!!!
« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2012, 11:08:34 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by jerrysleftyguitars

Note: bno, never tell a lefty to play righty (and there are lefty pianos).
Sure, lets beat this dead horse.  Exactly one company makes custom left handed pianos.  Learning to play a left handed piano would mean you could only play the piano in your house.  A lefty guitarist cannot casually pick up someone elses guitar as a guest.  I personally see learning an ambidextrous skill in a fashion that limits your opportunities to be less than optimal.  

As I sit here typing this on my archaic qwerty keyboard, it begs the question - do you use one of those left handed computer keyboard?  Just asking.
'94 Fly Deluxe
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