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Author Topic: Chroming a guitar  (Read 6349 times)

Offline Strandwolf

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Chroming a guitar
« on: July 13, 2011, 08:25:14 PM »
I searched for a suitable thread but didn't notice any beyond the Winter prototype discussion and didn't feel like tagging this on to that, though maybe I should have, given that there is some helpful info and opinion there.

Anyhoo, here's an entirely chromed car, including the windows--I guess those are silver-tinted. The chrome may well be actual chrome metal rather than paint, of course. Note that in the comments area the owner is somewhat ridiculed as an exhibitionist. On the streets of London...the photographer's YouTube channel is nothing but exotic sports cars spotted around town.

http://youtu.be/q3L-ljVPmWU
Parkers: Pick, cap, T-shirt, clock, and other assorted accouterments

Chroming a guitar

Offline Patzag

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2011, 08:55:26 PM »
I went down that route as I wanted my S3 originally to be chrome.  No one would touch this project.  Not Parker, not Shazrock.  Apparently, it's not a very durable finish unless you go for actual chrome.  There's stuff that sells to "chrome" anything.  It's expensive and results are apparently not guaranteed.
All that being said, the idea still tickles the back of my mind and I may one day buy a cheap guitar just to do the chrome thing and see what gives.

Pearl White Custom Dragonfly HSH 2010 / Voodoo Blackburst Custom S3 2011 / Ceriatone HRM amplifier / TC Electronics G-System / Various pedals / Waiting for Axe FX II delivery
Teal Fly Classic 1998 / White Deluxe Hard Tail 1994 /Axe FX III

Chroming a guitar

Offline mountaindewaddict

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2011, 09:49:15 AM »
That's Awesome!!!  It's like the Silver Surfer got tired of standing up! [:D] [:p]

Casey

Gear: Parker Fly Deluxe, NiteFly NFV2, Way Huge Pedals, Egnater amps, other stuff...
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Casey

Gear: Parker Fly Deluxe, Parker PDF60, Way Huge, Digitech / Hardwire, Line 6, Source Audio,T-Rex, and TC Electronic Pedals, Egnater amps, other stuff... God Bless!

Chroming a guitar

Offline Paul Marossy

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2011, 10:21:46 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Patzag

I went down that route as I wanted my S3 originally to be chrome.  No one would touch this project.  Not Parker, not Shazrock.  Apparently, it's not a very durable finish unless you go for actual chrome.  There's stuff that sells to "chrome" anything.  It's expensive and results are apparently not guaranteed.
All that being said, the idea still tickles the back of my mind and I may one day buy a cheap guitar just to do the chrome thing and see what gives.


Joe Satriani has one or two of those chrome guitars. I wonder who did those? I thought Ibanez even had a model with chrome paint, but don't remember for sure. Anyway, you couldn't do actual chrome unless the body was a type of metal that is suitable for chroming...

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Chroming a guitar

Offline Patzag

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2011, 12:23:44 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Paul Marossy

quote:
Originally posted by Patzag

I went down that route as I wanted my S3 originally to be chrome.  No one would touch this project.  Not Parker, not Shazrock.  Apparently, it's not a very durable finish unless you go for actual chrome.  There's stuff that sells to "chrome" anything.  It's expensive and results are apparently not guaranteed.
All that being said, the idea still tickles the back of my mind and I may one day buy a cheap guitar just to do the chrome thing and see what gives.


Joe Satriani has one or two of those chrome guitars. I wonder who did those? I thought Ibanez even had a model with chrome paint, but don't remember for sure. Anyway, you couldn't do actual chrome unless the body was a type of metal that is suitable for chroming...

__/\\/\\__PJM__/\\/\\__
http://www.DIYguitarist.com
http://www.myspace.com/j201jams



Here is the link if you want to do it.  I think these guys did JS's guitars.
I don't know the cost.  I tried to contact them but could not send the form, kept getting an error.
Looks pretty cool.

http://coatofchrome.com/page6.php


Pearl White Custom Dragonfly HSH 2010 / Voodoo Blackburst Custom S3 2011 / Ceriatone HRM amplifier / TC Electronics G-System / Various pedals / Waiting for Axe FX II delivery
Teal Fly Classic 1998 / White Deluxe Hard Tail 1994 /Axe FX III

Chroming a guitar

Offline jester700

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2011, 12:47:56 PM »
I used to spend lots of time on Jemsite.  Search their forums for more than you ever wanted to know about chroming a guitar - lots of Satch fanboys there.  The short version is, Joe's guitars have a fragile finish - they peel.  Most chroming done to a wood guitar will do this.  One that won't is the guys who electroplate nickel to the guitar, but general opinion was that nickel wasn't as nice looking as chrome, and often the process wasn't done well.  Unless you GOTTA have chrome, it's gonna be a big headache.
 

Chroming a guitar

Offline Paul Marossy

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2011, 01:26:56 PM »
At first I was going to say how do you electroplate a piece of wood?!? I always thought that what you were plating had to be some kind of metal. But according to some info I found on the net, it apparently can be done.

After reading up on it I can see why it wouldn't be very durable on a guitar body, though. There's just not a natural affinity for chrome on wood like there is with a metallic object. There's lot of opportunity for things to go wrong because you have to chemically treat it with something that the electroplating can adhere to, which sounds pretty sketchy by its very nature.

__/\\/\\__PJM__/\\/\\__
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Chroming a guitar

Offline billy

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2011, 03:30:45 PM »
Joe's guitars are more than likely done with something called "PVD," its a 5/6 layer coating and is a bit more durable than regular paint and involves vapor deposition equipment, so its a bit beyond a gun and booth.

I've got a schecter damien F body I'm going to paint chrome as soon as I get settled in my new digs next month.  I will try to post process if possible, but definitely pre/post results.

Normal "chrome" paint is hard to do with any consistency and it has a tendency to bubble and peel.  Any surface blem will show like a sore thumb too.

All this is probably why no one else will do chrome using paint (like I'm going to...)  [:p]
Billy

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Chroming a guitar

Offline Paul Marossy

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2011, 03:40:40 PM »
Yeah, chrome would really bring out any imperfections. [:0]

__/\\/\\__PJM__/\\/\\__
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http://www.myspace.com/j201jams

Chroming a guitar

Offline lucgravely

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2011, 03:43:06 PM »
I would think you could use a metal infused paint that would allow the chrome to bond. I like to see a Satch-Chrome guitar after just one tour (if he used it alot).

Luc Gravely
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Chroming a guitar

Offline Strandwolf

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2011, 11:38:15 PM »
"James Trussart is one of the few builders who has broken the mold of traditional guitar making. Working with steel as the primary material, he produces guitars that are as unique in appearance as they are in tone. Trussart’s creations like the steelcaster are designed to have the look and feel of a vintage instrument with the added appeal of a metal construction."

http://www.jamestrussart.com/#/products/3469897

How about a very light and thin titanium shell shaped in the Parker Fly design? Skip the wood and carbon fiber and just rely on pickups, strings, and signal processing for some sort of livable tones?

And then chrome the thing... [}:)]
Parkers: Pick, cap, T-shirt, clock, and other assorted accouterments

Chroming a guitar

Offline jester700

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Chroming a guitar
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2011, 07:27:36 AM »
Actually, I LIKE carbon fiber and it's easier & cheaper than titanium.  I wonder what a hollow carbon neck and "frame" body with just enough material to mount pups, bridge, etc. would weigh & sound like?
http://www.seymourduncan.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/100_1008.jpg