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Author Topic: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...  (Read 5846 times)

Offline sybersitizen

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2014, 12:37:36 PM »
... I also wonder just how important (or unimportant) that paper-thin gap at the ends really is in the scheme of things.
It could be significant. In set up terms thousandths of an inch can mean the difference between playability and fret buzz for instance. And because these appear to be "floating" there will be unwanted movement further buggering up the playing comfort level.

You misunderstand. If, for example, the fretboard wood has shrunk over time, or was not cut right to begin with, and the frets themselves are of the correct curvature and height, and have remained that way despite what the wood has done, and are rigid despite not being supported all the way to the ends, then those tiny gaps might not make any difference in anything. And attempting to 'press' the ends down against the wood might make it all worse.

In other words - which aspects of the neck are actually out of spec at the moment - the wood or the frets or both?
'01 Fly Deluxe|'69 SG Standard|'69 EB-3|Pignose Strat|Savannah SGO-16CE|Fishman Aura Spectrum|Roland Amplifiers

Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...

Offline Samsdad

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2014, 01:08:17 PM »
Update: Parker customer service responded to my message.  I asked if there was maybe some kind of recall based on neck problems.  They said no.  They also said that if the guitar was purchased new from an authorized dealer they could do a warranty replacement.  The shop owner told me that they were an authorized Parker dealer at the time they acquired the guitar (hooray).  However, there is some question as to whether a guitar manufactured in 2011 qualifies as new if it is sold today (boo).  The shop owner seemed to think the warranty had expired ... so, the saga continues.

Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...

Offline Barry

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2014, 09:45:20 PM »
You misunderstand. If, for example, the fretboard wood has shrunk over time, or was not cut right to begin with, and the frets themselves are of the correct curvature and height, and have remained that way despite what the wood has done, and are rigid despite not being supported all the way to the ends, then those tiny gaps might not make any difference in anything. And attempting to 'press' the ends down against the wood might make it all worse.

In other words - which aspects of the neck are actually out of spec at the moment - the wood or the frets or both?
Frets are initially set to the finger board's radius. Under normal conditions the frets remain attached to the wood and do not seperate! But you would typically be filing the ends back.

Here, changes to the original radius spec are minimal, and the least of your worries. Now you must deal with the "floating" ends, likely by reforming them to match the new radius, and possibly gluing them, if that's even an option. There's the real concern of cutting your fingers and probably messing up intonnation.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 09:49:41 PM by Barry »
Love one woman, many vintage guitars.
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PM-20 Hornet Red Bubinga owner & recovering GAS addict

Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...

Offline sybersitizen

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2014, 11:58:16 PM »
... In other words - which aspects of the neck are actually out of spec at the moment - the wood or the frets or both?
Frets are initially set to the finger board's radius.

Maybe these were, or maybe they weren't.

Quote
Under normal conditions the frets remain attached to the wood and do not seperate! But you would typically be filing the ends back.

But you didn't address my question above. It's possible that the frets are aligned exactly as they should be and only the wood is a little bit off due to shrinkage or an error in cutting.

Quote
Here, changes to the original radius spec are minimal, and the least of your worries.

I agree, there's not much worry there.

Quote
Now you must deal with the "floating" ends...

Must you? 1/8 inch of metal is not really much of a float IMO.

Quote
...likely by reforming them to match the new radius...

Sounds like they would need to be pulled in order to do that, but I don't know.

Quote
... and possibly gluing them, if that's even an option. There's the real concern of cutting your fingers and probably messing up intonnation.

The OP has had the guitar for six weeks and only just discovered the gap because of a buzz (which might not be directly related) and never said anything about finger issues. Some glue to occupy the small gap would probably be in order, but I'm not certain that anything more than that 'needs' to be done. Still, I'm not the one playing the instrument, so I really can't say.
'01 Fly Deluxe|'69 SG Standard|'69 EB-3|Pignose Strat|Savannah SGO-16CE|Fishman Aura Spectrum|Roland Amplifiers

Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...

Offline Samsdad

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2014, 12:47:26 PM »
UPDATE:
Parker asked the shop to ship the guitar to them rather than try to repair it themselves.  It will be interesting to see what Parker does.  I don't expect to hear much more about the issue for two or three weeks.

CONTINUING THE THREAD:
It is interesting to consider a possible mismatch between the wood and the frets.  It would have been helpful to see if the fingerboard radius actually matched the specification (the spec is 14", I believe) before I took it in.  I really don't know if drying/hydrating can actually change the fingerboard radius. 

However, I do know that the these types of cycles (drying/hydrating) can slowly move nails out of their (originally secure) positions over time as the hole expands and contracts with temperature and moisture.  It happens in houses all the time (the floorboards are especially susceptible in my house).  The frets on the PDF80 guitar appear to be hammered in just like a nail ... and (like a nail) expansion and contraction of the wood can cause the fret to move.  I have several guitars and some of them have been subjected to less than ideal conditions (like my Ibanez GIO).  There may be some slight fret movement in this guitar (the GIO) ... the frets feel like they protrude a bit from the edge of the fingerboard ... but any separation from the fingerboard is very slight (50 microns or less).  The separation I am seeing in the Parker is in excess of 100 microns ... so I've got to think that there is some real manufacturing defect in this particular case.

Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...

Offline stubby1060

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2014, 06:32:23 PM »
I have a PDF80 and the frets are terrible. You could slice your finger open if you pushed hard enough. I love the sound I get from this thing , but the craftsmanship is terrible. I have a $450 Epiphone 339 that's made in China and the fret work is fantastic. Go figure !!

Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...

Offline Barry

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2014, 03:23:48 PM »
Hi stubby1060,
Sorry to hear about your sharp fret ends, but it is an extremely common problem, especially as I mentioned elsewhere, if the guitar is assembled in a sub tropical area then brought to North America/Europe where the central heating and low humidity just shrink the wood unmercifully. If the wood has been properly dried out before manufacture, there's less chance of a problem.

I work part time as the Tech in a guitar store and I can tell you that I have lost count of the number of guitars that I'd had to take files to this year in particular, in order to remove the razor like fret ends. And that includes Gibson, Fender, and Music Man. It isn't an off shore problem,or related to any one brand exclusively.
Love one woman, many vintage guitars.
Or...was it the other way around?

PM-20 Hornet Red Bubinga owner & recovering GAS addict

Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...

Offline Samsdad

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Re: "New" PDF80 / fret repair ...
« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2014, 10:11:35 PM »
I have a PDF80 and the frets are terrible. You could slice your finger open if you pushed hard enough. I love the sound I get from this thing , but the craftsmanship is terrible. I have a $450 Epiphone 339 that's made in China and the fret work is fantastic. Go figure !!
Have you tried returning it?  What is the date of manufacture on yours?  Parker claims that there are no fret issues with these guitars.  They took mine back ... even though it was manufactured in 2011.  They've had it for about four weeks now.  I expect that I'll get it back within the next two weeks.  I don't know if they are repairing or replacing ... but I'll post my impressions here when I get it back.