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Author Topic: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany  (Read 2579 times)

Offline Montereyjp

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Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« on: April 21, 2015, 03:59:01 AM »
Hello everyone.. I am new to this forum having recently purchased a barely used 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany that I absolutely love.. It is currently the love of my life so I have been playing it for hours everyday mostly in my home studio improvising to jam tracks and originals I have written.. I live in Thailand which has two types of weather..hot and hotter.. and although I have the AC on after about an hour of playing I start to sweat so the guitar gets sweat on it where my arm rest against the body.. I am a sweaty guy and I know my sweat is corrosive so I am concerned it will eventually ruin the finish on the guitar.. I do wipe it down when I take a break and when I am finish. But...

Should I be concerned? Is there something I can do to help preserve the finish?
TIA JP

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline Patzag

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2015, 11:11:25 AM »
I don't have a nitefly but I've never needed more than mild soap solution to clean the finish of my well used guitars.
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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline sinom

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2015, 12:26:37 AM »
Same problem - wear long sleeves ! ;D

Been playing in Thailand for a loooong time, multiple guitars - no serious effect to any of the finishes so far !

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline ZemanG2

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2015, 09:33:02 AM »
It is a very thick poly finish, I sweat A LOT too and a quick polish and mine is still shiny after 7 years, I'd be more concerned keeping the frets clean. I've had one start to fall off on one of mine, I'm in Okinawa so I have similar weather.
I have guitars, most are beyond my playing level, but I love them all!

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline Montereyjp

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2015, 11:11:35 PM »
Well the worst has happened as my toxic sweat has worn off the satin finish on my 2002 nitefly that I originally posted about.. I play it on average at least 3 to 4 hours a day and now the finish is gone where my right arm rest on the upper body of the guitar.. I am diligent about wiping it down during every break and when I am done but still the finish is now gone..It looks whitish with a rough feel to it where my arm rest.. maybe a long sleeve shirt would have help as someone suggested but I only have one that is not a dress shirt and I have no idea where it is.. I did buy a bottle of Kyser wood polish for Instruments the other day but it does not appear to help much.. maybe a case of to little to late.. So what are my option now? common sense tells me to sand it with a very light grit sand paper and then re-apply the satin finish but.. I have no idea what type of satin finish was used or how it was applied at the Parker factory..The Parker I have does not seem to have a thick poly finish like the guy in Okinawa stated and btw the frets seem solid so far.. The guitar sings beautifully almost like an acoustic guitar even when not plugged in so I don't want to ruin that by applying a finish that would damped the tonal qualities of the mahogany.. Does anyone have any insight on how the finish is applied at the factory? Is it possible to pose this question to Parker directly?

TIA 

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline ZemanG2

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2015, 06:33:37 AM »
I did not know they came in a satin finish. My Martin has a satin finish and it just rubbed to a polished spot. Pictures?

*** I just read that it is a Satin finish....call around surely there is a luthier who could help, or call parker for help.

Id still love to see a photo, I often wish mine would wear like a nitro finish, so it would be sweet to see
« Last Edit: May 30, 2015, 06:48:13 AM by ZemanG2 »
I have guitars, most are beyond my playing level, but I love them all!

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline Montereyjp

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2015, 08:26:52 AM »
Ok ZemanG2.. I posted a link to three pics on Google+.. You can see the fading where my arm rest on top of the guitar body.. There are not many luthiers in Thailand and none I would use.. I have taken to wearing two elbow compression bands..one for my aching elbow from playing to much..well that and I am getting old..and another one below it to help keep the sweat off the Parker and so far it so good..

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B9dZe6UaslROV1lEOE9XTXFkcUE&usp=sharing
« Last Edit: June 03, 2015, 08:35:34 AM by Montereyjp »

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline Mr303

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2015, 09:15:26 PM »
This is a long post but it's interesting to nerdy woodworkers like me.


Here is a guide for testing finished wood furniture. It works with most finishes found on guitars.

My input......
Be careful,
Use your own best judgement about how you apply these solvents, how much, kind, duration.

When testing I will use a toothpick to apply very small amounts, it's always easier to add a little more than to wipe away excess quickly.

The refinishing paragraph mentions Scotchbrite which may help relieve some of the hazing or white glaze.

Again is is best to start with white (very fine) then use a progressively coarser grade until or if reaches the level of polish you hope for, but do not sand through the finish. 
I have grades of Scotchbrite from very fine to coarse enough to remove rust from steel.

If its getting out of control reverse the sequence of grades and go back progressively to the very fine but remember you're always removing the finish.

Scotchbrite is very controllable with respect to feel of the abrasive action under your fingers and because it conforms easily to the original contours better than sand paper. 
Tape off any sections with masking tape to prevent scuffing up good areas.

Always sand or buff with the grain rather than across it, be gentle because any deeper sanding marks require more removal of the surrounding surface to achieve good smooth acceptable results.

If I have any concerns that what I'm going to do may or may not ruin the piece its best to start small, and honestly a little will tell you a lot.

A little clear coat car wax might help too if it tests well especially if it's polyurethane.

Good luck!

 1. Start with alcohol Apply a few drops of denatured alcohol to the furniture, as shown in the photo at left. Wait a few seconds; then touch the spot with a soft-bristle brush or a cloth. Shellac a popular finish before about 1920 will soften and turn a bit sticky. If it doesn't, it's not shellac. Move on to Step 2. 2. Try lacquer thinner Change your solvent to lacquer thinner, and repeat the first step by applying a few drops of it to a new spot on the surface. If after a couple of seconds the finish softens enough to almost flow, you have lacquer. (You already know it's not shellac.) But if the finish only becomes tacky and you know that it was built in the last decade the finish could be water-based. To be sure, test further. 3. Maybe you need a stronger solvent Try touching a bit of xylene (available at hardware and paint stores) to a different part of the finish. If the test area gets gummy, you're definitely looking at a water-based finish.

What to do when nothing works
If none of these solvents dissolves the old finish, it has to be one of the reactive finishes one that cures through a chemical reaction such as varnish or polyurethane. You must thoroughly sand (scuff up) these film finishes before you can apply another coat of the same finish. Or, in cases of severe damage, you have to strip them completely off with a paint-and-varnish remover, then sand and refinish. Finish-restoration strategies Once you know what finish you're facing, you can restore it in one of several ways. Which one of the following you choose depends on the result you want to achieve.

For nicks, scratches, and small areas of damage, try reflowing the finish. A cloth dampened with denatured alcohol will reflow shellac. You'll be able to dissolve the original finish and move it around to cover minor damage, brightening the surface as you go. This also works on lacquer finishes when you use lacquer thinner as the solvent. In either case, don't be over-zealous. You could go completely through the finish.
Cut back the damaged surface film to a more presentable layer. Do this with 0000 steel wool (or gray Scotch-Brite) or 1,000-grit or finer sandpaper, and lubricant (linseed oil). It's much like sanding between coats when you want to build up a finish.

The trouble with this method: You don't really know how thick the finish layer is, so you could cut through it to bare wood. If your option to cutting back the finish is refinishing, you might as well try it.

Sand the existing finish with extra-fine sandpaper (400-grit or greater) or 0000 steel wool (unless you're putting on a water-based finish, then use gray Scotch-Brite rather than steel wool so you won't end up with tiny rust spots).

Then, remove all dust with a tack cloth and apply another coat of finish. It's not necessary that you match the commercial brand of original finish, only the type shellac, lacquer, water-based, etc.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 09:18:47 PM by Mr303 »
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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline ZemanG2

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2015, 07:08:37 PM »
Hey thanks for sharing the pictures. I can see your concern about it getting worse. I wonder have you ever seen those invisible pick guards for guitars? If so could that be possible to use on the area your arm rests. That would offer a good layer of protection.
I have guitars, most are beyond my playing level, but I love them all!

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline Montereyjp

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2015, 04:29:07 AM »
First off I want to thank Mr303 for his detail response, I really appreciate the knowledge but I am not at the point that I want to totally refinish the guitar.. A little Scotchbrite might be all I need but not sure if I can source it in Thailand.. In the mean time cleaning my AC unit and wearing a thick compression sleeve where my arm rest on top of the guitar has stopped me from getting sweat on it.. Then every time after I play I apply "Kyser Wood polish for instruments" to that area with my hand and gentle rub it in like I am applying baby oil on my GF backside..lol. Then wipe it off with a very soft cloth and now the white is gone and you can hardly tell it was ever there, but the wood is still rough on the edge where my forearm rest.. you cant see it but you can feel it which is not an issue for me now that I am wearing the compression sleeve over my forearm.. It maybe an issue for the next owner although I will never sell the guitar..I will be dead when the next owner gets it but I would want them to enjoy it has much as I do..so I want to fix it.

Maybe over time the compression pad will smooth it out.. Or maybe the Scotchbrite.. or extra extra fine sandpaper..

And to Mr ZemanG2.. Thanks for the suggestion but like I mention the sleeve is working great so no need for a clear guard.. The thing is I have been getting into jam tracks using a couple of applications for the Ipad.. Then I plug the Ipad into ether my digital recorder or my Vox Mini 5 and jam practicing all the scales from Ionian to the Phrygian  using these outstanding jam tracks.. and then the next thing I know 2 hours is gone..Ok.. I take a little break and I start again.. when I look up at the clock, boom another two hours gone. And I am having so much fun sometimes it is unbelievable..Hence why I am wearing out the Parker.. :D
« Last Edit: June 15, 2015, 04:36:45 AM by Montereyjp »

Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany

Offline bradyvictor178

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Re: Sweating on my 2002 Parker Nitefly Mahogany
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2015, 01:13:00 AM »
Ok ZemanG2.. I posted a link to three pics on Google+.. You can see the fading where my arm rest on top of the guitar body.. There are not many luthiers in Thailand and none I would use.. I have taken to wearing two elbow compression bands..one for my aching elbow from playing to much..well that and I am getting old..and another one below it to help keep the sweat off the Parker and so far it so good..

Hello Montereyjp... I am newly register here and jut visited your google+ page your guitars is looks good.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2015, 02:51:39 AM by bradyvictor178 »