Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Changes to Mojo Midi  (Read 4688 times)

Offline CJBCJB

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Changes to Mojo Midi
« on: September 11, 2015, 02:03:59 PM »
Hello, does anyone know whether the Mojo Midi has been changed since 2009?  I'm about to buy a 2009 model and am interested to know whether newer models might have an advantage.

Thank you ;)

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline jb63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2015, 02:40:45 PM »
The new models use the graph tech system, the old ones use the GK pickup.
Both are nice and work essentially the same for many functions. The 2009 ones have the old headstock and the new ones have the new headstock.

Ther mojo midi started out with a gk pickup. I don't remember what year they switched to the piezo pickup. Do some image searches. The earliest mojo midis had the gk pickup, with the fisherman silver saddles and powerchip for the piezo, then the new headstock arrived, then the GK was switched to the black graph tech piezo saddles. The controls get a little simpler by 2013.

Depending on how what kind of patches you use, you may prefer a GK pickup to a piezo for your sound midi control.

Here are some pics from a 2010 article, still with the GK pickup and the old headstock:



http://www.musicradar.com/reviews/guitars/parker-fly-mojo-midi-electric-guitar-279000

Clearer pics on the sweet water page, but with the new headstock:



http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/FlyMidiTCY

Here's a 2010 one with the old headstock.

http://www.mygear.com/items/view/33770/false/Parker+Mojo+MIDI+Fly++Brand+New++save+1000

Here is the current setup:



The new ones look really streamlined with the controls, while the GK equipped ones look a little cluttered.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 03:48:12 PM by jb63 »

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline CJBCJB

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2015, 04:03:33 PM »
Wow, I really appreciate that detailed response!  I've never owned a midi guitar before so this is new to me.  You mentioned that the GK pickup may be preferable -- can you say why? 

I mainly plan to use this with a Roland GR-55, for recording, and I'm looking forward to using a MIDI guitar for writing in Sibelius.  Accuracy is important.  Of course I'd like to use it at gigs, too, but that's not the main thing.

I can either get a 2009 model or a new one.  The 2009 NOS is $3200, an okay deal.  I'm not so concerned about cost as quality, and I know that newer is not always better . . .

Thanks again,



Depending on how what kind of patches you use, you may prefer a GK pickup to a piezo for your sound midi control.

« Last Edit: September 11, 2015, 04:41:08 PM by CJBCJB »

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline jb63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2015, 11:22:09 PM »
We if cost isn't a problem, get a pretty one. Honestly, get the one you feel is prettiest.

You are in for a challenge of a lifetime, because there is more information than you will ever be able to digest.

Start here:

http://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?board=61.0

This will be your most valuable forum. You may want to join.
Basically, if you create patches, some sound better with the go pickup. Some are better with the piezo. It depends A lot upon your playing style, which will definitely change as you adapt to the tools. You will find your technique become like a classical player pretty quick.

I have had a lot of luck with both types of pickups and notation with Sibelius, but I'm currently looking for a better transcription program. I'm just looking very slowly.

Whichever guitar you get will be great. I've always aftermarket modded them because I couldn't afford the price tag, but I drool over those new ones when I see pictures online. Just be ready to learn a LOT of new things all right away. Pretend it's school and make a schedule and you can be on top of it in about a month or 2.

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline CJBCJB

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2015, 07:54:16 PM »
Thank you so much for your advice!  It has been really confusing to read about how the Ghost piezo causes more crosstalk and doesn't work well with COSM modeling, etc.  It's good to know the GK and Ghost systems are basically equivalent.  I'll take your advice and buy the prettier one, the more recent model.

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline jb63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2015, 12:23:49 PM »
You won't be sorry.
The hours to come will be taming your settings and understanding you extremely complicated gear.
If you end up going into the gr55 from your piezo pickups, the one thing you will encounter is ground loops, wait, the two things you will encounter are ground loops and subsonic rumble, wait the three things you will encounter are friend loops, subsonic rumble and ghost notes....

Wow that was a pretty bad Monty Python rip.

Ground loops are easy. They happen to us all now and then and you've probably dealt with them.
Subsonic rumble is an annoyance with the piezo pickups that the gk pickup didn't have. It also wasn't a problem with the vg99. You can buy an RMC filter that you install into your gr55 that cuts some frequencies and solves the problem for live playing. Ghost notes will all be about your technique, which will mutate as you go.

As long as you are ready to school yourself you will be fine. It's a fun, fun ride.

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline CJBCJB

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2015, 03:13:21 PM »
Wow that rumble doesn't sound like fun.  Do you know whether there is a controller that works better with Graphtech?  I'm thinking of just getting a different guitar with less problems, maybe an earlier model with the gk pickup ...

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline jb63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2015, 03:56:17 PM »
These aren't problems with the guitar, but issues you get to tame with 13-pin midi implementation and piezo saddles.

As far as playing a midi guitar, there is no other guitar that plays like a Parker.
It would be slightly easier to start with a GK3 strapped to your guitar. That's how I started. From there you learn all sorts of stuff and the pickup is an actual magnetic pickup, but you can get all the same results from any of the systems. Tou can do some searches and see what others have to say about this stuff, but I swear by my gear and I don't regret a moment of the hours I spent learning to use it. Jump on and get wet. That's the way to go!

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline jb63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2015, 04:11:14 PM »
Since I'm posting, and I have no affiliation, you should just go buy this one:

http://forums.parkerguitars.com/index.php/topic,15867.0.html

Make sure the truss rod works and you like the color. You get a prerefined with all the stuff including the master volume, the an installed GK system.

If you have to start somewhere, this is a great car to drive.

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline Big Swifty

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 396
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2015, 01:23:26 AM »
Hey, i'll add my little .02 AUD cents here,

Once upon a time, many years ago, i had one of these:



Ahh, the venerable Casio PG 380 midi guitar..Actually not a bad player at all, another one in the series of things i shouldn't have sold, had an onboard GM synth too!

So here's my understanding... the thing about midi guitar systems is that the convertor(?) (not sure what it's called) that translates guitar notes into midi info needs to see a clear wave/cycle before it can translate it into note info, though i'm sure its a lot quicker these days.

With guitar strings, the first bit of the waveform the pickup sees is mainly just "noise" from the plectrum hitting the strings, so it needs to wait through that first.

The other thing is that the lower notes have a far longer wavelength, hence it takes just that little bit longer for a clear reading, so to speak.

At least that's how it used to work.

I imagine the piezo pickups transmit a lot more bottom end thumping and bumping and etc, hence making it harder for the translation to occur.

However, i'm just postulating here, haven't played one, the PG 380 was, like, back in the 90's, and i imagine things have changed somewhat

But yeah, you gotta adapt your playing style, pick cleanly etc

It was great fun, sold it in the end because the more i played, the less and less i used the midi stuff, but that's just me.

Howevs, good luck!

You GO midi guitarist!

(once was midi, now)Big Swifty!
94 Fly Deluxe
2010 DF 524
The system can't get you in your dreams.

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline jb63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2015, 12:19:05 PM »
I think it works that way once you get more playtime.

That is, you get to get right on in there with your magnetic pickups and just plug & play.
SO MUCH advancement in the technology has made playing Synth Guitar more learning than playing. You have to have a LOT of time or some serious study skills.

I think I only do it now because it's something no one in my town does. Less of a novelty, more of a unique voice. It also allows me to enjoy my schizophrenia onstage. There isn't enough of that anymore.

Here's the link I meant to add to the post i made above:

http://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?topic=3236.0

Its only a little reading but it explains most of what you will be up against and its really a pretty easy fix.
There's a great guy in New Hampshire selling his GR55 w/subsonic filter installed AND the GK3 wart for a totally decent price. His posts to that forum have been really useful.
I've never met him or anything, but that's a good price for a clean unit:

http://www.vguitarforums.com/smf/index.php?topic=16233.0;topicseen

Plus if you have a fly with piezo saddles you can mount the GK3 with sticky tape and experiment between the 2 types if signal carrier.

Way back when I started this stuff everything was about twice the price.
Speaking of twice the price, I'm pretty sure I can gauge the economy of the USA by what people are buying used Parker Fly Guitars for.
They seem to be going for about $500 less than last year. Plan accordingly!

I still wish I had time to play the guitars I have, but I will always, ALWAYS make sure to get out and perform as often as possible. Everybody with a Parker should figure out how to do that, because it makes all the difference in the world when you play one of these for a crowd, no matter WHAT you do with it.

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline CJBCJB

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #11 on: September 22, 2015, 02:16:08 AM »
Thank you all so much for the advice!  It's a complicated subject, it's a niche that not everyone understands, and I feel like I've just had a solid college lecture!  It was so hard figuring things out but you really made it simple.

In the end I found a great deal on a new Adrian Belew signature model -- well beyond what my non-existent MIDI guitar experience justifies, but it's my 40th birthday present to myself.  I am sure either guitar would have been great but I love the Belew.

Give me a few weeks to acclimate to the guitar and I'll report back. 

I can't tell you how helpful this has been.  I hope I can return the favor -- when we're on a subject I know something about ;P 
« Last Edit: September 22, 2015, 09:52:12 AM by CJBCJB »

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline jb63

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2015, 07:56:36 PM »
Nobody has reported in here about their belew guitars. A lot have tried to make them out of cheaper models.

To me, I can't live without the neck pickup. But I think the sustainer may also act as a pickup.
Also, I'd love to know if you can play along with the heroes and scary monsters albums and use the varied dials to find similar to tones.

You are in for a lot of fun!

Re: Changes to Mojo Midi

Offline CJBCJB

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Re: Changes to Mojo Midi
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2015, 10:30:20 PM »
I'm back to report on my AB DF842 and Roland GR 55.  I've had these for about a week. 

I had the chance to purchase either the older Adrian Belew model with Variax, or the DF842.  I read that the Variax needs power via the 13-pin connector and I didn't like that.  It seemed redundant when you're already connected to a synth pedal.  And the Variax takes the place of a regular pickup.  The newer model is mahogany, and the older one is poplar.  It was an obvious choice in the end. 

I am very happy with the DF842.  The sustainiac is FANTASTIC.  It's simple, really enhances my playing and it's a lot of fun.  Yes, it works as a regular pickup.  You can turn the sustain function on and off, and also the octave boost.  Works great just plugged into the amp through a quarter inch jack.

The rest of the pickups are decent, the piezo is not all that special, but that's not what this guitar is about.  It's about the sustainiac, the lightness, the perfect neck and playability.  The tone is on the darker side and I like that.  I could be happy with this guitar forever without a synth pedal.

I had some tracking issues at first with the GR55.  It is darned near perfect now, though, since I adjusted the string sensitivity on the GR55 and set it up for RMC pickups.  This was pretty self-explanatory.  Really, there are no tracking issues at this point.  I'm not going to need that extra RMC wiring.

The GR55 is really powerful.  It is also quite complicated for a first synth pedal.  You can make your own patches.  Crazy.  There are so many patches already programmed into the GR55, you would be hard pressed to play through them all.  One thing I'm having real issues with is assigning patches to a specific pedal instead of dialing each patch up (which would never work in a live performance).  I'm getting some help on this point and if I work it out (and anyone wants to know), I'll get you the answer later on.

One slightly disappointing thing is that, when you're plugged into the GR55, the sustainiac stops working.  The volume and other controls on the guitar stop working.  You're just using the GR-55.  That's not so bad, though, because the GR55 does a pretty good job itself.

I want to thank everyone here for giving me such great advice, it really helped me a lot!