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Author Topic: Fried PCB?  (Read 1604 times)

Offline Mark Luce

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2017, 12:45:52 PM »
Hi TinMachine,
Yes, and our precious pale blue dot would be a much more beautiful place with more Billy's.
Are you by chance Reeves Gabrels? I know he (you?) used a Parker on Tin Machine recordings – which I loved by the way and still occasionally listen to.

Hi JamieCrain,
My inner voice says you are correct. When I get the multimeter I will take the PCB out and see if it has a reverse-polarity-protection-fuse underneath the PCB (it certainly doesn't on top) – in a perfect world it would be wise to have a fuse on any PCB, but alas, it is not a perfect world and I fear the worst.

Hi Big Swifty,
Yes, my Parker is a 94 Fly Deluxe, serial number 226144BP – the last 4 =1994 and the B = basswood neck and the P = poplar body which I believe signifies it being a 94 Fly Deluxe, so I have the 14th Fly Deluxe produced on the 226th day of 1994 – if my memory of what the pre-refined Parker serial number means is correct.
I am the only owner, I know that for a fact; I bought it directly from the Korg Rep Allan Pearlman on September 23, 1994 it was his rep Parker Guitar (Korg was distributing Parker Guitars at the time) – I knew Allan and after playing it for about 5 minutes I told him I had to have the guitar right then and there and that he could not leave the music store with it and he laughed and said okay, he was on his way back to NYC anyway and could get another one for his repping, so I bought it formally through the music store we were at (Drome Sound upstate NY) within about 15 minutes after playing it; all the parts are original except for the 9V Battery Snap Connector replacement I personally made a few years ago. And you could be very right on the Parasite Plug Switch not functioning, which would certainly explain the battery drain, maybe that little guitar cable indicator protrusion sitting in the top of the guitar cable input cavity is getting stuck when the guitar cable is pulled out (it is still sliding in and out perfectly fine when I take it out and look at it), thank you very much for bringing that up, that is a very good point and I should have thought of that, I will spray some cleaner in there and work it and test it.

Hi Billy,
Rochester is a fairly big city with lots of great musicians – I was there a few times many years ago, and I thought it was the one time home of Ken Parker where he worked at a grandfather clock factory and refined his instrument/woodworking craft; so I'm surprised there are not hordes of proud Parker owners in Rochester, especially being that it is a superior guitar – although I am personally fond of the Strat and Tele sound for certain guitar sound needs, but the neck and intonation of the Parker is in my opinion simply the best I have ever played; I never understood the appeal of a Les Paul, they are very uncomfortable to sit down and play and too heavy on the shoulder when strapped on, maybe in the later 60s it was okay for a certain sound, but hell, even Jimmy Page used a late 50s Tele on many of the Zep recordings – certainly exclusively on the first few albums according to what I have read. Ibanez makes good instruments, I have an SR5XXV Limited Edition, and it is a gem of a bass, although I have never owned an Ibanez guitar.
And thank you very much for your email and the attachments of the schematic and the hard wire instructions and the instructions for the Fishman switchjack.

Peace and regards all,
Mark

Re: Fried PCB?

Offline TinMachine

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2017, 06:47:00 PM »
I suppose I could be anyone.  Gabriel Reeves I am not. Good tie in with the tin machine tag though. I did however own a guitar that was once owned by Vernon Reid (aha,  see another famous Parker player) .  Parker guitars are quite unique, however,  I'll never get rid of my SSS strat. Just can't do it.

Re: Fried PCB?

Offline Big Swifty

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2017, 08:22:02 PM »
Also, those original parasite switches were/are well known for breaking down/not working, mine became unreliable after about 8 years, and i replaced it with the Fishman jack mod. I wonder if there are actually any of those original plug/switches left these days?...

I guess you mean available as spare parts? Dunno. Mine is still in the Deluxe, where it's always been.

No, i actually meant still in the guitars, based on my own experience and those of others, but i guess there well may be many of those original jacks still in service.

Who woulda thought....

B.S.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2017, 10:43:09 PM by Big Swifty »
94 Fly Deluxe
2010 DF 524
The system can't get you in your dreams.

Re: Fried PCB?

Offline Mark Luce

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2017, 12:02:50 PM »
Hi TinMachine,
I know exactly what you mean with the SSS Strat; I have my cherished Fly Deluxe (in my opinion the most perfectly constructed guitar I have ever played - not mine personally, but all the Parker's I played at a certain upstate NY music store from that 94 to 96 pre-refined era, I don't know about the later models because I've never seen one (in person) or played one), and I have a Tokai Goldstar Sound that I bought new about 35 years ago after reading about Andy Summers using them on the road and praising there playability and the exact Fender sound, so I went to the local guitar store wanting to purchase a Breezysound Telecaster but they only had one Goldstar hanging there and I played it and bought it, it is supposedly an exact replica of a '57 Strat in wood and parts and sound but I wouldn't know having never heard, seen or played a '57 Strat, but it certainly sounds like a Strat; and I have a Mexican Strat that I bought used about 15 years ago from someone over here who needed the money and I told him he could have it back for the same amount whenever he wanted it but he never took me up on that offer; both sound and play great although a bit of a buzz problem on the Tokai on the 15th fret area that I'm having a tough time zeroing in on the cause - slight truss rod and saddle adjustments are not really helping - any suggestions by anyone would be appreciated. I never did get that Breezysound Telecaster, and now they are collectors guitars, but I will at some point get a Tele or Tele imitation, gotta have that Tele sound. So yes, that SSS Strat sound rules and that and the Tele are definitely staples of Rock - with a decent amp or virtual amp of course. 
Kind regards from an ice age like Austria, 
Mark

Re: Fried PCB?

Offline billy

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2017, 02:24:39 PM »
Thanks for all the kind words Mark!  Went off grid this weekend.  Me and the penguins had some quality time together.

Rochester is an interesting city for sure.  Lots of great musicians, partially as a result of having a world class music school courtesy of George Eastman.  The sad thing is that there are very few places to get a gig, much less enough gigs to make a living from.  Ken Parker was here for a time, but I think that predates his work on the fly.  Lots of great woodworkers here too.  Unfortunately, most of the big companies that started here are mere shadows of what they used to be, but optimistic for new things to make their mark.

I don't really like LPs either, but I understand the appeal.  I think.

For your tokai, you might just have a high fret.  I have seen guitars with a slight hump but not often.  If you sight down the neck from the bridge (not the nut), you should be able to see better what's going on.  Might just need to pressed in a bit or leveled slightly. 

There was a time I fixed a guitar for a friend because of a similar issue- it turned out that he took the neck off and wasn't careful about returning the screws to their respective holes.  So he ended up with a longer screw in a place where a shorter one needed to be, and it pushed the fret below it up slightly.  Easy fix once I noticed what happened.
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

Re: Fried PCB?

Offline Mark Luce

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2017, 07:16:49 PM »
Hi Billy,
Thank you very much for the high fret info, and I will do what you said by sighting down the neck from the bridge; if I am pretty sure I do in fact have a high fret I thought I would then take the strings off and use a perfectly flat something (its flatness I can verify with a carpenters level) that will cover no more than three frets and see if it rocks over a particular fret to determine what fret and how much of the fret is too high to be more exact, and once I come to that high fret conclusion what do you mean when you say "Might just need to pressed in a bit or leveled slightly", how does one press the fret in a bit and how does one level it slightly? You have been so kind with your help and time that I feel I don't want to bother you with so many questions, but is there a You Tube vid on this high fret issue that you know of that is good you can link me to? I found one where the guy is using a credit/bank card to see if the fret rocks, but every one of my cards are not perfectly flat - when I look at them sitting on my carpenters level held up to a light, there is light shining through at portions on the bottom that sits against the level – which I trust is level, so I have to find something perfectly flat and short enough that covers just three frets, this high fret issue has to be perfect I think. 
I really wish that my Tokai – which has great sounds, could have as perfect action as the Parker has – the Parker has perfect low action along with perfect intonation and it is and always has been a joy to play which is why I fell in love with it in the first place all those years ago. My Mexican Strat is actually pretty good and better than the Tokai but not as good as the Parker action. How did Ken Parker design/make and mass produce such a perfect guitar with such perfect action and why doesn't every guitarist in the world have one? It amazes me that the pre-refined mid 1990s Parkers did not become the must have guitar that they should have become.
And I assume that the use of penguins is a term of endearment for children? I raised two daughters who are both grown up and out on their own now, one is in Berlin and the other is in Vienna.
I would have thought there would be a ton of band clubs in Rochester; and believe it or not, Vienna too – the city of Mozart, Brahms, Strauss, etc. is not a band friendly city by any means, one would assume otherwise being that it is an international city and hub of Central Europe, there are lots of DJ/dance clubs, but only a few band clubs – two that I can think of excluding the big hotels, and those two are mainly for smaller alternative European bands touring around Europe and maybe having a local band open for them (but usually not), there's no place for decent musicians who have put a good sounding band together to go out and play over here, that's why I play at home in my small home studio like a lot of other musicians do the world over, such is our lot in life. 
Kind regards from a Arctic like Austria,
Mark

Re: Fried PCB?

Offline billy

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2017, 11:53:23 AM »
Hi Mark

penguins reference = term of endearment towards my kids/very dry joke about the weather.  And no worries, I'm happy to try to help- no quota!  This might be a very boring place otherwise.

If you sight down the neck as described, you'll see a high fret, twist, etc. Lots of things can cause a buzz, not always easy to track down but a process of elimination can get it fixed. If you do have a high fret, you may also see a slight gap between the underside of the fret and the fingerboard.  Another thought is that maybe you have something weird going on in the neck pocket, though if so, I'd expect it to be across all the strings.  I have a 6" metal rule that I use to verify which fret might be high.  Your straight edge can be longer, it will just be less likely to rock, though you will still see an adjacent gap if a fret is high.

If it is high, I'd first try to tap it back into place with a soft hammer.  If that fails, then maybe a little superglue and a clamp.  Otherwise, if it is actually seated fully, you'll have to file the high one to match the height of those around it, crown it, and polish. Not extremely difficult, and relatively low risk, but if it gets screwed up, you'll likely need at least a partial refret. 

I'll see if I can find a few good youtube links and post, at least you can see if its something you want to try or not.

Sounds like a similar situation in Vienna with live music.  I haven't done much recording the way I used to before kids, but starting to do a little here and there with old friends.
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

Re: Fried PCB?

Offline TinMachine

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Re: Fried PCB?
« Reply #22 on: January 12, 2017, 12:36:58 PM »
Could just need relief on the truss rod!