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Author Topic: Repair Little Scratch on the Fly Headstock.  (Read 470 times)

Offline alber.t

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Repair Little Scratch on the Fly Headstock.
« on: May 28, 2017, 06:47:51 AM »
Hello everyone.One of my fly guitars had a broken sperzel. Unfortunately when I try to change the sperzel from the four string I scratch a little the headstock. A tool slipped while I was pushing. I was a little stupid because I always tape every guitar when I work. Is there any way to repair the scratch? Being carbon and epoxy I do not know what to do. I tried to polish and improved a lot. Now the area brigh. I had to polish the entire blade except where the Parker logo is.

 
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 08:49:35 AM by alber.t »

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline billy

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2017, 12:31:48 PM »
Hola Albert

Unfortunately, the logo is silkscreened on top of the clear coat. 

To get back to satin and not disturb the logo, you could remove the tuners, and mask all but the face of the headstock. 

Then lightly sand with 800 grit sand paper, clean, and spray clear satin lacquer with a very light mist until you get even coverage. 

You'll have to wait a week or so to put it back together.

Personally, I'd probably just live with it and love it even more.
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline TinMachine

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2017, 05:10:55 PM »
Silkscreen logos are available

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline Big Swifty

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2017, 06:35:11 PM »
OR...

Rather than re-applying a matt finish, you could try just matting the current shine you have ended up with.

Stop after light sanding? (maybe with a higher grit..1200/1500 wet'n'dry)

I've had success from making a thick paste out of the washing powder AJAX (a mildly abrasive kitchen/bathroom powder cleaner) and using a nail brush/toothbrush to "rub" it over the finish. This has worked very well on aluminium and created a very even matt finish.

Or possibly something like Brasso and fine steel wool?

Just ideas though, it's going to be an operation of finesse however you go.

Or yeah, just leave it and love it...these kinds of things have a way of just getting bigger and bigger....ever read "The Cat in the Hat Comes Back"?

:-)

Ciao

B.S.
94 Fly Deluxe
2010 DF 524
The system can't get you in your dreams.

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline billy

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2017, 08:26:27 PM »
All good points but please don't use steel wool anywhere near your fly. Little bits can get in the frets and pups and get rusty in no time flat. Steel wool is not nice to stainless.

Matting an existing finish and trying to remove a scratch of unknown depth can be tricky. Since he asked the question, I have to assume minimal experience. 

Same with silkscreening. All of this is easy once you know how but man that first step is a doozy.

You could also bead blast it with low pressure or use baking soda as a blast media.

Another idea is to just make it all shiny by polishing, being especially careful at the logo. Again, easy once you know how...
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline TinMachine

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2017, 09:32:19 PM »
I also have gold Parker raised decals. Probably like the ones they used on the acoustic line.

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline Big Swifty

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2017, 11:35:55 PM »
Did I say steel wool?

Ooops...

Yes..steel wool...no..bad..don't do it!

Thanks for picking that up billy.

B.S.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2017, 04:30:16 AM by Big Swifty »
94 Fly Deluxe
2010 DF 524
The system can't get you in your dreams.

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline Big Swifty

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2017, 06:31:23 PM »
Hi Albert,

Looking at that pic, actually i'd say just leave it as it is.

That's a pretty small scratch, all things considered; the polished looks pretty good to me and i think the process of trying to replicate the factory finish would be quite difficult to achieve and make even etc.!

Sure, it's not factory perfect, but you know..in a couple of months you won't even notice it i reckon!

Anyway, that's what i reckon.

B.S.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2017, 06:33:31 PM by Big Swifty »
94 Fly Deluxe
2010 DF 524
The system can't get you in your dreams.

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline sybersitizen

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2017, 02:29:02 PM »
I would like to know if my operation is reversible.

I don't think you should try to reverse it.

The headstock on my Fly doesn't look very shiny; but the fingerboard (which is made of the same material) is shiny ... presumably from years of being 'polished' by fingers. In other words, they do not exactly match.

Look at your guitar and you might discover that your headstock and your fingerboard now match quite well.

Also, that tiny scratch is insignificant. Not a problem at all.
'01 Fly Deluxe|'69 SG Standard|'69 EB-3|Pignose Strat|Savannah SGO-16CE|Fishman Aura Spectrum|Roland Amplifiers

Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.

Offline billy

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Re: Repair Scratch on the Fly Mojo Headstock.
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2017, 08:52:27 AM »
I sure hope I can live up to the kind words, Albert!

Anyway, fixing a small scratch or chip has two basic approaches. 

The first, is to fill the scratch so that it's a bit proud, and then level the fix to the surrounding finish via sanding and polishing.  This works best on scratches that are deeper.  Cyanoacrylate (super glue) works really well for this if you are careful and apply sparingly.

The second is to lower the surrounding finish until you reach the bottom surface of the scratch, again, by sanding and polishing.  This is best used on scratches that do not penetrate very deeply into the top coat.

So which approach you take depends on the scratch, ie how deep it is, does it involve a color coat and clear over the top, etc.  The main idea being that you want to limit how much finish is removed and also how much sanding and polishing you have to do.  In some cases, where a scratch goes through the color coat and the clear, you'd have to first do a color fill that isn't higher than the clear, then a clear fill over that which is proud.

In this case, you've used the second approach but the scratch, though small, is a bit too deep for that.  The good news is that the carbon isn't damaged, so it didn't go completely through the clear coat.

Everything is further complicated by the satin finish and the silkscreen logo. 

Something that makes this repair even a bit more difficult is that now you also have polish residue in the scratch, so that will have to come out.  Otherwise it will show in the repair you would like to do. 

You're basically going to need to make the scratch slightly bigger/deeper to remove the polish.  Then fill and level it, then scuff up the surrounding finish.  Then mask the sides of the headstock along with anything else you don't want paint on, and then respray clear satin.  Alternatively you could bead blast it but that makes preserving the logo a bit tricky.

I'll email you more specifics on respraying later today, a lot depends on the spray equipment and experience.  The good news is that you can practice on other stuff first and then decide if it's all worth it.

Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]