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Author Topic: woe is moi  (Read 1147 times)

Offline billy

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woe is moi
« on: October 23, 2017, 10:30:06 AM »
JB suggested a thread for equipment damage caused by kids.  Might be interesting to just include damage in general to gear.

A few highlights:

- played an outdoor gig on a windy day.  2 songs in, and the drummer's crash cymbal catches a gust and it blows over.  When it hits, it slices right through the power cord on my amp head.  Fortunately a pocket knife and some electrical tape saved the day.  Easy fix later but glad no one (me!) got fried.

-had a 4x12 cab I was loading up some outdoor stairs to a gig.  It was raining and slippery.  Me and the cab went for a short ride, and I damaged some ligaments in my back.  To this day I have to be careful or I'll strain it. Should've just let it go.  Switched to 2 space rack gear and a pair of 1x12s soon after.

- a friend playing roadie is helping us pack up and load new rack gear.  He forgets there's a midi cord still connected to the back of my rack gear and starts to carry the rack offstage.  Snaps the connector off the cable, and also damages the internal solder connections to the midi jack on the back of my preamp.  Easy fix with my experience in pcb assembly but killed the warranty since I had to open it to fix it.

- my dad had a black steinway grand piano he bought before he got married to my mom.  I was a toddler with one of those wooden hammer/workbench sets and hammered on anything within reach.  I guess the hammer on the piano made a really interesting sound, because I hit it about 20 times, putting little dents in the side that remain 45 years later. 
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

Re: woe is moi

Offline Patzag

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2017, 05:20:04 PM »
"- my dad had a black steinway grand piano he bought before he got married to my mom.  I was a toddler with one of those wooden hammer/workbench sets and hammered on anything within reach.  I guess the hammer on the piano made a really interesting sound, because I hit it about 20 times, putting little dents in the side that remain 45 years later. "


Ouch!!!!
Teal Fly Classic 1998 / White Deluxe Hard Tail 1994 /Axe FX II

Re: woe is moi

Offline billy

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2017, 12:37:23 PM »
yeah, they're not very deep, and the paint is still there, but still...

A few more for the list:

1.  Just bought my first brand new guitar at the age of 16, after saving the whole summer:  A kramer focus in glossy black, complete with locking whammy. 

Brought it to my drummer friend's house a few days later to jam.  Had it in the open hardshell case, on the floor, while I hooked up my amp, and he was doing some tuning on his snare. 

He got up to put the snare back into his kit and along the way, dropped the tuning key, where it landed smack dab on the front of my new guitar, just below the whammy.  Left a pretty decent ding about 3/8" in diameter.  I'm not sure who felt worse... but soon after that I wasn't quite so worried about it.  At least my dad could kind of relate.

2.  A kid at uni was a fan of the band I was in and was learning to play guitar.  I helped him out here and there and he came back to uni with a neon yellow Ibanez Jem he got at a pawn shop for very little $$. It needed a setup very badly, and he asked if I could take a look at it.  It was in great shape aside from the setup, the whammy springs were way over tightened, and the action was way low to try to compensate. 

I was using his tools, and his screwdriver tip was a bit rounded out.  I really had to bear down on it to get the whammy claw screws to loosen up. 

As I'm turning it, the springs are creaking, and he freaks out a little bit thinking they're going to come loose and hit someone (yes, he was an engineering student). 

He tries to cover them up while I'm turning the claw screws and bumps my arm.  Screwdriver slips off the screw and skids across the back leaving a 3" scratch.   

Probably still worth a good bit of money as an original jem, and it played awesome when I was done, but man, I felt awful that I was involved at all.

My kids- did you know that you can cut a .009 gauge string with kid safety scissors?  True.

3.  I build stomp boxes as a hobby.  I have a really nice wah from an old dunlop shell that I stripped and powdercoated to use with a new pcb I built.  Wah sounds great.  My youngest kid asks me what all these boxes are, and I say you stomp on the switches and they change the sound in the amplifier.  She proceeds to jump as hard as she can on the wah, isn't impressed by the sound, and fortunately doesn't fall down.  But she stripped out the mounting pin to the rack that engages the gear on the pot and now I have to replace that.

4.  I used to have a guitar stand in the living room at our old condo with one of my electrics on it.  My oldest was a toddler and had a plastic grocery cart that made music, etc and was really helpful when learning to walk.  She's cruising along at a good clip and doesn't hit the guitar, but rather a swivel chair next to the stand that had a box with some books my wife was packing up.  The box didn't quite fit between the arms so it was just off the center of gravity, and my wife had only left it there for a few minutes prior.

Anyway, the chair swivels, the box tilts, I see what is transpiring and get out of another chair just a little too late.  The box falls off the chair, lands on a corner, continues to roll on the corner, and of course hits the back of the guitar.  The guitar falls off the stand, just out of my grasp, and lands face first on the hardwood floor.  Just a loud smack, a little bit of scuffing and some dents in the floor, but really I was just so thankful that it didn't hit my kid, didn't break anything, and fortunately it wasn't my parker!  No more guitars in the living room after that.

Numerous other stories of crayons, markers that are "washable", long hair caught in tuning pegs, stage antics, etc.
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

Re: woe is moi

Offline syncopa

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2017, 07:26:41 PM »
I really only have one... While playing a psychedelic party when I was in High School, we were playing Careful With That Axe Eugene by Pink Floyd. Just before the scream comes I turn to my microphone as the headstock of my Kramer Baretta smacks it. The most clamorous cacophony ensues and no one can figure where it's coming from as I look up and see the headstock hanging from the Floyd Rose locking nut and smacking against the fretboard. Could never quite repeat that performance. :o
« Last Edit: October 24, 2017, 07:28:25 PM by syncopa »
1998 Fly Classic, FB4 Bass, P6E acoustic, DF522 FR Dragonfly

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Offline billy

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2017, 03:45:20 PM »
lol..
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

Re: woe is moi

Offline syncopa

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2017, 12:12:01 AM »
It was really quite strange because things were in tune and in cadence but there was something just clanging along and out. Once again could never reproduce it.  8)
1998 Fly Classic, FB4 Bass, P6E acoustic, DF522 FR Dragonfly

Re: woe is moi

Offline Notes_Norton

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2017, 10:03:55 AM »
1) Bought a brand new H.Couf Superba sax. Previous to that I would leave my saxes on the stand up front while on break. But with the brand new sax, I figured it would be safer moved back in front of the amps. The first week I had it, some drunk, dancing to the DJ on our break hit the mic stand, and it made a direct hit on my brand new sax leaving a crease down the side.

2) This back in the 1980s.  The last Christmas gig of the year I'm playing in a duo with MIDI files and a rack full of sound modules for the backing tracks (which I make myself). One of the synth modules is a sample player that loads with a floppy disk. I have the kick drum I use most often and a Left/Right snare drum pair that I use for all rock songs because the rolls don't sound like machine guns. I also have a synth bass, other percussion instruments, and a fingered Fender Jazz bass that I sampled myself.

Our next gig is New Years Eve, which was booked 2 years in advance, for 5 times our normal rate, and by this time there are no other groups available to sub.

The sample module goes crazy. One touch of the rack causes the module to power down and instantly power up again, taking about 2 minutes to read the disk before it can play. So I'm careful not to touch the rack all night.

The next day I take it to a repair tech. It's going to cost an extra $50 for emergency service, but the manager and a couple of hundred guests are depending on us to show up. So he sticks a probe in the circuit and sparks fly. Completely dead. Power supply fried.

He says you'll have to send it to the factory - which is closed until after New Years. In other words it won't make the gig.

Now I had over 300 sequences at the time, to transfer the drum notes to those of another module, change the patches for the basses, and adjust the volumes for balance would probably take a few weeks. Not an option.

So I started calling music stores (this was Pre-Internet) in Miami (4 hours away) and worked my way up the coast. Not showing up or showing up lame is not an option. I would have flown across the country to find a replacement unit. I don't care how much money I'd lose. The customer was a regular customer, hiring us monthly, and I couldn't let him down. Calling, and calling, and calling I finally found one in the opposite direction 2 hours away. A customer ordered it and never came to pick it up. The gig was saved.

And I learned to purchase duplicate sound modules for everything I use. I am now a member of the Department Of Redundancy department.

I now mix my synth modules to audio files, and play them on a computer because I don't want to bring two 10 space racks full of synth modules to the gig. But I bring two computers, they are both up and running on stage at all times, and if one fails, I can switch the USB cable to the other one and the show goes on.

Since 2002 when I started this, I've gone to the spare 3 times. Not bad for doing one-nighters for a living - but in each case they saved the gig. Cheap insurance if you ask me.

3) Didn't happen to me but a band-mate. We were gigging on the road, somewhere in the Midwest in a college town. The stage had a rock waterfall background with a little pool of water on the bottom.

Our drummer used to chain his drums to his stool so they don't creep on him. A foot of his drum stool went off the stage and down into the pool of water he went, with the drums following him. Fortunately no permanent damage other than some cosmetic scratches occurred. Afterwards it was very funny but at the time it wasn't.

That's all for now.

Notes
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Bob "Notes" Norton

Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com aftermarket styles for Band-in-a-Box and Microsoft Songsmith

The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com the best duo in South FLorida

Re: woe is moi

Offline Notes_Norton

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2017, 10:06:49 AM »
I really only have one... While playing a psychedelic party when I was in High School, we were playing Careful With That Axe Eugene by Pink Floyd. Just before the scream comes I turn to my microphone as the headstock of my Kramer Baretta smacks it. The most clamorous cacophony ensues and no one can figure where it's coming from as I look up and see the headstock hanging from the Floyd Rose locking nut and smacking against the fretboard. Could never quite repeat that performance. :o
Not as tragic but similar.

Practicing for a gig in a band member's living room. The guitarist had a Gibson SG (red of course) and we took a break. Since the stands and other gear was still packed up, he leaned his SG against an easy chair. We were in the kitchen and heard a noise. the SG slid on the carpet, hit the floor, and the headstock broke and folded over the neck of the guitar. Tragic.

Notes
------------------

Bob "Notes" Norton

Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com aftermarket styles for Band-in-a-Box and Microsoft Songsmith

The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com the best duo in South FLorida

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Offline billy

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Re: woe is moi
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2017, 09:12:59 PM »
I think it was the drummer for living color that had a set underwater for practicing?  Everything was underwater except his head.
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]