Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Quality Control & Parker  (Read 7995 times)

Offline PeterMa

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 517
Quality Control & Parker
« on: May 04, 2006, 11:12:30 PM »
When I worked for Guitar Center I remember receiving guitars, new in the box, $1200-$3500 American made instruments, directly from the factory, with major problems.  Gibsons with finish issues; pickups wired in reverse, frets popping off.  Fenders weren’t much better with; bowed necks beyond adjustment, blown truss rods, and again, finish issues.  Bad pots, machine heads that didn’t turn or hold the string properly were common on everything.

These guitars were all “hand crafted” by American luthiers and demanded a high price.  Out of 10 Les Pauls that came in I could find at least one issue with 9 of them.  The same with high end Fenders.  These instruments were created in factories that were long established and had a high production output.

Which brings me up to my point:  In some ways this Parker Forum is a fishbowl and I wonder if it is easy to loose perspective.  Not all people that purchase a Parker are on this forum.    Not all people that have positive experiences with their instruments post comments.  Yet a lot of energy is focused on the negative at times with the new Parker factory and Quality Control.  

Do I think that every guitar should be perfect when it leaves the factory, especially if I am shelling out 2-3K for it?  Absolutely.

Do I have an expectation that every guitar will be perfect?  Absolutely not.

As I see things, US Music bought a boutique guitar company with a semi-established name in guitar manufacturing with the goal of turning that good reputation into a money making business pursuit.  When the factory was in Wilmington, they were not making money.  Layoffs of the factory staff were common.  My guitar teacher worked at the Wilmington factory for 2 years and fielded the repair requests for over-seas distributors.  I even interviewed there once myself (consequently, I am not talking out of turn).  If you know about the various buy outs and buy backs prior to US Music you may agree that Parker showed signs of financial distress.  From what I heard and saw, Parker was in dire straits prior to the buyout.  

So from where I sit, US Music came in and SAVED Parker from closing.  Go ahead and read the press from before the buyout.  Read between the lines.  Parker was not going to be around much longer.  They were having a hard time selling their guitars because they were too different from a Fender or Gibson.  Guitar Center dropped them because the staff there just couldn’t sell the instruments & the smaller shops were mad because of the wait time for instruments so Parker lost some of these retailers as well.  

In order for US Music to make it a profitable business venture, they decided to move the Parker factory to Chicago.  Do you know what it is like to move a house full of stuff from one end of town to the other?  If you have a wife and kids you know that it is torture.  Imagine moving a factory half way across the country.  
Think of it: staff, machines, already built instruments, computers, wood, etc.  On top of that you are offering jobs to EVERYONE that works at the Wilmington facility a job in Chicago and trying to figure out all of the staffing issues.  In addition you are adding another factory to an already established manufacturing facility (Washburn, Eden, etc).

Guess what, a lot of the people that worked at the factory didn’t want to move to Chicago.  Who could blame them?  In turn, Parker looses a few of the cogs that put the guitars together.  So then they have to retrain people on instruments that they are not too familiar with building while integrating into a new factory while trying to get everything running (not necessarily running well)  Stupid stuff like where to put a machine and where to store inventory & how to get the right people to operate the factory becomes paramount.  

So US Music has committed to keeping Parker in the marketplace & from what I can see they want to do things right.  If you guys don’t know anything about the Washburn line, a few years ago it was not considered to be nearly as reputable as it is now.  What used to be an average guitar company is now turning out very high quality solid body guitars, both import & American instruments.  Check out their Idol or Pilson.  The same guy at US Music (I forget the Presidents name) that turned Washburn around has decided to work his magic on Parker to make the line more successful-this is good for us.

On top of it they are coming out with more models of the Parker FLY, they are doing what they can to make the import line more competitive and demand begins to increase.  It is exciting when new models come out.  There was a lot of buzz at NAMM with Belew.  So the PR guys at Parker are doing their jobs.   These new lines increase the amount of work that is required at the factory on every level, how could it not?  & since the PR guys are doing there job, we the consumer wants them, preferably sooner than later & without a doubt, absolutely perfect.

The cross that Parker has to bare is that the typical Parker consumer is absolutely nothing like the Fender or Gibson guy.   It’s great that there is a market for the instrument but Parker is held to a different standard and I think that is fair since we are not only buying into the guitar but also the technology behind the instrument.  We as Parker users have more demanding criteria by which we judge and choose guitars and many of us are non-traditional in what makes us happy.  A Fender & Gibson guy doesn’t have a criteria beyond looks and tone, we do.  

So am imperfect guitar arrives and a snowball of negativity towards the entire company starts to build and I don’t think that this is fair.  

It has been a few years since US Music came in and it will probably be a few more years until their tolerances get tightened.  We are talking about factories & factories take time to settle and maximize efficiency & productivity.

Bottom line: Parker is still producing high quality innovative guitars.  Not all of them are going to be perfect.  

I apologize for the long post and please understand that I am not trying to offend anyone be implying that their concerns are not valid.  It just seems that perspective gets lost here sometimes and I wanted to share my thoughts.


Peter in MA.
_____________________________________________________________
1998 Parker Fly Classic W RMC Peizo & Seymour Duncan JB & Jazz Pick-Ups
2001 Parker Fly Deluxe-Standard
Soon to be the proud owner of a P8E Acoustic
Takamine EF381 12 String/Ovation MCS 148 Mandolin/Yamaha AES 620/Charvel Acoustic.
Acoustic line is run through: Boss TU9/Boss Compressor Sustainer/Boss AD7 Acoustic Modeler/Ibanez Tube Screamer/Ernie Ball Volume Pedal/Boss Looping Station into a Crate CA-125D.  
Electric line is run through: a Mark Tremonti Wah, & Boss Octave Pedal Into a midi controlled Yamaha DG-80.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2006, 11:16:57 PM by PeterMa »
Peter in MA.


Quality Control & Parker

Offline DrJeff

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2006, 11:52:51 PM »
Well said, Peter. Any qualified Quality Engineer will tell you that you cannot inspect in quality. You have constantly refine the processes. Easy enough when you deal with standard mechanical product assembly, but a little tougher when a large part of your product is literally art.

The test of quality in a company has less to to with whether or not a defective product slips through final QC into the field, but how that company actively seeks to make it right when a field defect is discovered.

About a year ago, I bought my son his holy grail Gibson SG Standard. A weak place in the neck caused the headstock to nearly break off -- while the guitar was in the case. I talked with their service guy in Nashville and, once he understood the situation and, of course verified the SN, replaced it with a brand-new factory-fresh model. That experience gives me all the confidence to spend major bucks on a Gibson product. I know that, in the unlikely event of a serious defect, they will make me whole with an absulute minimum of hassle.

With the limited contact that I have personally had with the US Music folks, I have the same confidence. Now, about that scuff mark on my SA...'97 Nitefly SA
'78 Music Man Sabre II
'79 Music Man Sabre II
'83 Ovation Balladeer
Ampeg Reverberocket
Tech 21 Trademark 60
Crate CA125
Rgds,
Jeff

Quality Control & Parker

Offline jamrcat

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3137
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2006, 12:07:03 AM »
Peter I appreciate your thoughts and feel you have made some important observations to consider.

Anita Bryant, I'm sure no one would know or remember her - she was a well known Christian artist back in the 70's that once said something that stuck with me. "It's not how well you do when things go right that makes you a professional, it's how well you respond when things go wrong that determine whether your a professional or not" I think that principal can apply to companies and industries as well. It's how a company responds when things go wrong that will determine whether they have lasting success or not! I'm hopeful things will go well for Parker in the future. Just a thought!

Parker P36 (Red)
Adamas II 1982
Washburn RS-10V 1987
Fender Tele USA 1998
Korg AX1500G Toneworks
"A Fly for each hand!"

Quality Control & Parker

Offline ChicagoKid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 866
    • http://www.USCustomShop.com
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2006, 12:36:22 AM »
Nice post Peter. Well said and oh yeah..... "boobs" (Inside Joke)[;)]

www.USCustomShop.com <coming soon>
www.USCustomShop.com <coming soon>

Quality Control & Parker

Offline 908ssp

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6365
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2006, 07:41:15 AM »
Excellent post Peter. I think we have heard all this in bits and pieces before but your post brings it together in a very easy to understand manner. Thanks for taking the time to write this. It is easy to loose sight of the big picture when you focus on one thing at a time.

Like a splinter in your finger doesn't leave you much attention for a beautiful day. [^]

Alex

Alex

[IMG]http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r245/908ssp/ThumbNails/_1010802.jpg[/IMG

Quality Control & Parker

Offline Jason Davis

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 562
    • http://www.JasonDavisMusic.com
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2006, 08:07:59 AM »
Peter,
Thank you so very much for your post.  Honestly, it is a breath of fresh air to hear your comments.

For the rest of us on the board, he is dead on concerning the history of Parker.  I spoke with many of the people from the MA factory prior to the move to IL, and it is true that many could not make the commitment to relocate half-way across the country for various personal reasons.  With Parker Guitars being so different, it should be expected that the learning curve for both manufacturing and customer service is difficult.  When calling Customer Service, you are talking with a US Music representative...not a Parker Guitars rep.  In time, everyone will be up to speed with exactly how Parkers work.  Patience is difficult I know when you are not satisfied, but all will be fine in time.

And yes, Parker Guitars would have literally been out of business if US Music hadn't come in.  We're talking about a week difference between saving the company and its demise.  Speculation of an exorbanent amount of debt due to low sales and the cost to produce such a high quality instrument would probably be fair, but I can't confirm that.  If that was the case, a large company such as US Music would probably have the means to take that on if they believed in the product enough to save it.

We also need to understand that while Ken and Larry started the company, Ken did not own the company....even after Parker's break from Korg.  That is a big misconception.  Even in interviews with Ken, he never comes out and states "I own the company."

Being human nature, we tend to respond more easily when negative things happen.  Rarely does a teacher get praise from a parent for their impact on a child, but that same teacher surely gets an earful when he/she has done the child "wrong".  My wife's a teacher (and a good one at that), and the stories she comes home with always baffle me.

Listen guys:  I believe it is completely fair for an unhappy customer to come to the forum and express his displeasure.  Although the dealer from where the guitar is purchased is always the first step in having the situation remedied, the presence of John Page on the forum is great as he can give feedback on how to have the situation remedied beyond standard protocol.  It's also my guess that the ratio of satisfied vs unsatisfied customers has remained the same.  We're just looking at larger numbers as more guitars are being sold now than ever before.

I visited the US Music location about 1-2 weeks after the move from MA (which was done over a weekend), and I found it absolutely remarkable that they were in production.  I saw the new PM-10, PM-20, and unfinished prototypes of the Southern NiteFly and Mojo SingleCut literally on the workbench.  I have the pictures to prove it, and the fact that there was close to no stop in production and r&d during the move is amazing.

All this to say that I agree with Peter that expectations of perfect guitars to come out of the factory is ideal but not realistic.  That certainly does not change the unhappiness that one may feel if a guitar they purchase is flawed, and those feelings are completely justified.  Know, however, that the situation will be remedied.  With Parker's wait time for producing their guitars, it is also expected that their timeframe for repair would be somewhat lengthy.

No offense to anyone meant with my comments either.  Just food for thought.  It's all good.

Jason Davis
guitarist/songwriter/producer
www.JasonDavisMusic.com

Jason Davis is a Parker Guitars, Emerald Guitars, Randall Amplifiers, Mojo Strings, and BMG Music Publishing Artist.  Join Jason's MySpace community at www.myspace.com/JasonDavisMusic


custom Jason Davis Parker Fly (coming soon) - Parker Nitefly Mojo Flame (cherry burst) - Parker Fly Deluxe (antique gold) - modified PM-20 (sunburst) - modified PM-20G (gold top)

Quality Control & Parker

Offline loumt123

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2700
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2006, 11:42:48 AM »
Just playing the devils advocate here, but...

"All this to say that I agree with Peter that expectations of perfect guitars to come out of the factory is ideal but not realistic."

    If I am not mistaken, John P said they can only dish out so many american made guitars because it takes time to make/finish them by hand...am I correct? If it takes this time, shouldn't it be done right...and extra 5 to 10 minutes to make sure you aren't screwing anything up. I mean, these are not imports here.  Gibson and Fender guitars are constantly in stock, and if i remember, correct me if im wrong, parker could not meet the demand for everyone (thats why music 123 and musicians friend etc etc have parkers on order...not in stock). Is there a reason the US made guitars being put out have flaws like poorly cut nuts, scratchy toggles, some BIG fit and finish problems, and possibly more defects?
 

Quality Control & Parker

jwrooker

  • Guest
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2006, 12:31:01 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by cmpkllyrslf96

Just playing the devils advocate here, but...

"All this to say that I agree with Peter that expectations of perfect guitars to come out of the factory is ideal but not realistic."

    If I am not mistaken, John P said they can only dish out so many american made guitars because it takes time to make/finish them by hand...am I correct? If it takes this time, shouldn't it be done right...and extra 5 to 10 minutes to make sure you aren't screwing anything up. I mean, these are not imports here.  Gibson and Fender guitars are constantly in stock, and if i remember, correct me if im wrong, parker could not meet the demand for everyone (thats why music 123 and musicians friend etc etc have parkers on order...not in stock). Is there a reason the US made guitars being put out have flaws like poorly cut nuts, scratchy toggles, some BIG fit and finish problems, and possibly more defects?



I hope that these are falling into the growth pains associated with the move.  Time will tell.  I am getting a stronger feeling that the intent is certainly there and steps are being taken to correct problems.  

A year ago, I was saying..If my NiteFly M is this good, how good must a Fly Mojo be?  Since then, I've read of problems..ironically in this group sponsored by Parker, and I've personally had a Parker with problems.  Now, I'm not as sure as I was last year.

This is not to be negative, so please don't take it as such.  If I was not a Parker fan in some way, wny would I have over 300 posts hers?  Why would I waste my time?  I'm not looking for Parker to replace my Gibsons..I'll always love them, but I want to be a Parker supporter again.  I don't want surprises like the one I had when I sold my Southern NiteFly again.  (I don't want to go into details, so please don't ask..suffice it to say that I gained a ton of respect for John Page over this matter amd I owe a debt of gratitude to the buyer who has been very cool about the whole deal).  If I buy another Parker it will be a Fly Mojo, but I want to feel more secure in knowing that there is not some problem I'll have to deal with when I open the case.  Yeah, I know the "You don't have that feeling with G or F, do you?".  Well, I am three for three positives on G's in the last three years and only 1 of 2 in Parkers.  

I want to believe in Parker again..I really do.  Thanks for listeneing

John Rooker
Olde Pharte Guitar Hacker
Rochester, NY
--------------
Parker NiteFly M
Gibson ES335 Light Burst
Gibson SG Standard Natural Burst
Gibson ES135 Vintage Sundburst
Alvarez acoustic
Vox AD15VT, AD50VT & UltraSound AG50DS3

Quality Control & Parker

Offline Jason Davis

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 562
    • http://www.JasonDavisMusic.com
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2006, 12:42:55 PM »
'Sup Lou.  Hope all is well.

Saying that "...the US made guitars being put out have flaws..." would insinuate that ALL US-made Parkers have flaws.  I'm sure you didn't mean that, but I had to point it out.

All I can speak about is my experience, and I have never had a problem with any Parkers I have acquired...regardless of the owner of the company.  My pre-US Music models and my most recent guitars are all of the same quality, thus I am very happy with Parker's quality workmanship.

I understand your logic and thought process.  It would be curious to find out the % of guitars produced by a large manufacturer (insert brand here) that do not meet the quality expectations of its consumers and compare it to Parker.  I would guess that they would be quite comparable.  Parker cannot meet the demand as quickly as a larger company because there are far less workers, so I'm not sure that quality control relates to their ability to meet demand...???

I certainly do not claim to know the manufacturing process of a guitar (I can't change my own car's oil let along build anything...you should have seen me putting together my son's swingset!), but I would imagine that an "extra 5 to 10 minutes" would be relatively insignifant to the overall amount of time.  Everyone'e opinion here as welcome, but my guess is that a larger percentage of us have no clue about the guitar construction process, especially when it comes to building a Parker (perhaps those that do have experience in building guitars could chime in and help)!  Those of us without the experience really can't speak of how doing this or doing that in the construction process would enhance/detract from an instrument.  I guess all we can do is know what we want/like and make a purchase.  8^)

I firmly stand behind Parker and the quality of their instruments based on my experiences with them as well as other guitar manufactures.  I wouldn't be a part of their Artist roster if I didn't completely believe in them.  My wish is that everyone is more than content with their Parker purchase.  If not, then it will be remedied.  Of course the other alternative is to purchase an instrument by another manufacturer.  My personal experience tells me that there is nothing like a Parker in features, innovation, and quality.

Jason Davis
guitarist/songwriter/producer
www.JasonDavisMusic.com

Jason Davis is a Parker Guitars, Emerald Guitars, Randall Amplifiers, Mojo Strings, and BMG Music Publishing Artist.  Join Jason's MySpace community at www.myspace.com/JasonDavisMusic


custom Jason Davis Parker Fly (coming soon) - Parker Nitefly Mojo Flame (cherry burst) - Parker Fly Deluxe (antique gold) - modified PM-20 (sunburst) - modified PM-20G (gold top)

Quality Control & Parker

Offline uburoibob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3262
    • Bob Martin 11:11
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2006, 07:23:25 PM »
FWIW, I have only owned used Parkers. But I have been amazed at the consistency in fit, finish and quality of the instruments. I have owned dozens of new Gibsons and Fenders and Martins and (fill in the blank) and have never seen guitars that are as predictable (in a good way) as Parkers. Some of that is owed to Ken's design. And much is owed to the construction process. Honestly, I have found that this forum is emminently positive - especially compared to some I visit. I had my doubts about a larger company taking over Parker, but after reading posts by, and interracting with the US Music people, I am thrilled that they have Parker. Growing a brand is a long, time consuming process - especially one as radical as the Parker Brand. In any case, Peter, thanks for the post. You nailed so much. Everyone, thanks for the posts. I think Parker has a brilliant future. One that I will continue to try to be involved with! I love these guitars, and I'd love to be the ad agency that sells them.

Bob Martin

2000 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail  *  1999 Parker Fly Deluxe w/DiBurro Roland Mod Metallic Red  * 1998 Fly Classic in Transparent Emerald Green (thanks, Jim!) * 1998 Fly Classic in Transparent Dark Blue (thanks, Darren!) •  Now on a signature reduction program! Just the Flies, maam. *  www.rtmadvertising.com
1999 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail Butterscotch -   2000 Fly Standard Classic in Cherry Red - http://bobmartin1111.com

Quality Control & Parker

Offline loumt123

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2700
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2006, 08:07:38 PM »
Yes I understand you too mr. davis i've just been compiling the data in my head for a little while now.

  from what ive gathered, post US music takeover parkers have gotten consistently worse...i've noticed a group of users whose instruments from the earlier part of the takeover have a finish comparable to that of the pre takeover. keep in mind i mean this in no offensive ways to parker..just an observation from my view. There is also someone here who has had 5 out of 5 flawed parkers, all from the post takeover if i'm not mistaken. There also seems to have been a change in the quality of parts. JohnP stated himself at one point in here something like them  trying to save a few cents here and there caused a ruckus. Also, could it be a possibility parker could have handpicked models to show you especially, since you are an artist for them? I mean, what company in their right mind would give one of their endorsers a faulty piece of equipment. This is simply what ive noticed. I, myself am completely content with my parker (pre US music takeover) and i'm sure that there are newer ones that are up to par, but i cant help but think it's getting consistently worse, you know? I mean, for someone to get 5 parkers, and all of them have defects? that says something. And for JohnP, I think he's an awesome parker rep, and he stands by the company to assure the consumer the guitars are still of top quality, but what if some of the luthiers or workers just aren't working up to par like we seem to think? It just seems to me one day someone randomly needs to select some guitars fresh out of the shop, examine them, and address the issues that could be there....kind of like a pop quiz.

    Now that being said I hope no one flips out on me[xx(] I mean everything in the kindest way possible, i'm not saying the company is awful or anything of course. I am still a loyal parker customer, but if chances are im going to get a faulty guitar, you can't help but wonder.
 

Quality Control & Parker

Offline bno

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2006, 08:32:44 PM »
I think people need another kind of reality check - go price out and "real" handcrafted guitar - or a good archtop, a Warwick bass or an Alembic.  $6K to $15K.  If you want a "good" Gibson its $5K.  If you want a flawless work of art that has been nurtured and personally attended to, order it through the custom shop, pay for your elevated expectations and get exactly what you want.  If you order a production unit, even under the highest level of quality assurance, a small percentage of units will be "up to spec" but not flawless.  

The point is that the Parker has produced and awful lot of darn near flawless production Flys so there is an inordinately high level of expectation that trickles down through the entire brand.

This is compounded by the current Parker distribution model which places new owners in the position of having ordered a guitar that they feel is "made to order" when in fact they are just getting a unit off the production line when its their turn.  You can't simply go into your local guitar store pick one out, check it over and take it home.  


'94 Fly Deluxe
Listen first, then play.

Quality Control & Parker

Offline loumt123

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2700
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2006, 09:08:27 PM »
with all due respect, 5 out of 5 parkers isnt "a small percentage". and alot of the flaws aren't minor ones. and take into consideration someone who has a custom instrument made and it comes to them flawed. this wasnt just off the production line...it was custom made!

"The point is that the Parker has produced and awful lot of darn near flawless production Flys so there is an inordinately high level of expectation that trickles down through the entire brand." and this seems to be true for the past. recently it seems more and more problems keep arising. your right...not everything needs to be flawless, but when a single person buys 5 guitars, and all 5 are flawed, something is wrong. and when you get a USA made guitar, that's supposed to be thoroughly checked before it is shipped and you come to find the neck is beyond help, something is wrong. just read some of these issues...it's not what someone should come to expect when they purchase a guitar of this price and calibur.
 

Quality Control & Parker

Offline uburoibob

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3262
    • Bob Martin 11:11
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2006, 09:31:49 AM »
I think somewhere there is some sort of numerical theory that puts your "5 out of 5" statement in perspective. In my 51 years, it seems that there are statistics like this that skew the mean. 5 out of 5 for one person does not mean that 100 percent of Parker guitars are bad. It just means that the one person is kind of like the guy who gets struck by lighting repeatedly. It's not a statistic that's meaningful. If so, then it would be just as valid to say that of the 8 Parker Flys I've owned, zero have been bad. Does the cancel out the 5 that this one person had?

I know that I have gone philosophical here, but having been in biz for most of my life, dealing with just about every aspect from manufacturing to distribution to marketing and advertising, there is always an anomaly which, if focused on exclusively, will absolutetly distort the bigger picture. But I think that the bigger picture is that the quality of Parker guitars is, for the most part (and I mean huge most part) the best in the biz. That's not saying that things don't go wrong and need to be corrected, but that's true of any business on any day of the week at any hour.

Parker quality, in my pretty vast experience, is and has been better than any of the bigger companies, such as Gibson, Fender, Guild, Martin, Taylor, Ibanez, and on down. The only buying experience I've had that has resulted in better guitars are ones I've commissioned from builders such as Steve Andersen and Steve Klein. And those guitars STARTED at $6500 each.

So, thanks Parker for making the best guitars around. I'll take your minor issues any day.

Bob Martin

2000 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail  *  1999 Parker Fly Deluxe w/DiBurro Roland Mod Metallic Red  * 1998 Fly Classic in Transparent Emerald Green (thanks, Jim!) * 1998 Fly Classic in Transparent Dark Blue (thanks, Darren!) •  Now on a signature reduction program! Just the Flies, maam. *  www.rtmadvertising.com
« Last Edit: May 06, 2006, 09:34:37 AM by uburoibob »
1999 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail Butterscotch -   2000 Fly Standard Classic in Cherry Red - http://bobmartin1111.com

Quality Control & Parker

Offline Jason Davis

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 562
    • http://www.JasonDavisMusic.com
Quality Control & Parker
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2006, 09:48:59 AM »
Just for clarification, the Parkers in my possession are from the Korg, post Korg/pre-US Music, and US Music eras.  Not all of these guitars were acquired as artist models, so the idea of Parker sending me models handpicked especially for me would not be an accurate assessment...especially if I did not acquire all of my Parkers directly through the company itself.

I can only speak for my direct experiences with the Parkers that I own.  That happens to be of practically every era in the company's existence, and they have all been excellent.  I cannot speak for anyone else's experiences, so I can't support or argue their opinions because I would then be providing second-hand information to the others.  This is in no way to discount any experiences good or bad that others may have had with their own instruments, but it's just not my experience.  

Lou, I can understand your concerns due to the info you have heard, but you will really not know for yourself until you actually own a US Music-owned Parker.  My bet is that you would come away as a satisfied customer.  And, no, I'm not sending you the money to buy one, so don't even ask.  8^)

The passion at which all of us speak here at the forum (no matter the position) is directly related to the passion we have for Parker Guitars.  I think that's great and is a testament to our love and respect for these instruments.

Now let's all leave our computers, grab one of our Parkers, and jam out.  Me?  I'll be playing...oh, the baby's crying so I gotta run.  You guys play some stuff for me, ok?  Some mid-to-late 70s Zappa would be great!



Jason Davis
guitarist/songwriter/producer
www.JasonDavisMusic.com

Jason Davis is a Parker Guitars, Emerald Guitars, Randall Amplifiers, Mojo Strings, and BMG Music Publishing Artist.  Join Jason's MySpace community at www.myspace.com/JasonDavisMusic


custom Jason Davis Parker Fly (coming soon) - Parker Nitefly Mojo Flame (cherry burst) - Parker Fly Deluxe (antique gold) - modified PM-20 (sunburst) - modified PM-20G (gold top)