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Author Topic: Intelligent Design? Evolution?  (Read 51515 times)

Offline whitecityafg

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Intelligent Design? Evolution?
« Reply #165 on: March 29, 2010, 09:25:59 AM »
If I can make comments about this.

Do you really think that a name to endorse "famous" guitar (Parker for example [:D]) is necessary?
Do you really think I bought (I'll buy) this one because Mr X... plays it?

Actually, these famous players have so many other guitars, they don't really care about endorsement, I guess, except for money.
I would say : it depends on the final goal of the company, quality or buiseness! Both would be the nicest way, of course.

OK, may be I'm going too far, but personally I got my Parker for the real exact sound I was looking for, and surely not because one "name" could play it.

That's only my point of vew, but answering Waggerman.
Guitar : Parker P 42
Amp : Bugera 15 watts (all tubes)
Effects : Vox tonelab LE

Basses :
1) Fender Jazz Bass American deluxe active
2) Squier Precision Bass, special series
Amp : Behringer BHL 3000 - 300 watts

Intelligent Design? Evolution?

Offline Patzag

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Intelligent Design? Evolution?
« Reply #166 on: March 29, 2010, 11:08:43 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by whitecityafg

If I can make comments about this.

Do you really think that a name to endorse "famous" guitar (Parker for example [:D]) is necessary?
Do you really think I bought (I'll buy) this one because Mr X... plays it?

Actually, these famous players have so many other guitars, they don't really care about endorsement, I guess, except for money.
I would say : it depends on the final goal of the company, quality or buiseness! Both would be the nicest way, of course.

OK, may be I'm going too far, but personally I got my Parker for the real exact sound I was looking for, and surely not because one "name" could play it.

That's only my point of vew, but answering Waggerman.

Guitar : Parker P 42
Amp : Bugera 15 watts (all tubes)
Effects : Vox tonelab LE

Basses :
1) Fender Jazz Bass American deluxe active
2) Squier Precision Bass, special series
Amp : Behringer BHL 3000 - 300 watts



Yeah. I think that a truckload of guitar players bought this and that model because "Joe Guru" plays one. Absolutely. In fact, it's not a guess, it's a certainty.

That may not be true of Parker players on this forum because most of us are religious zealots on Parker.   We treat Fender players as unenlightened and revere Ken as the guitar prophet (OK, enough already [:)]).

But I know that a good number of my fans (yes, I have some) went and bought Parker guitars because they either saw me play them or tried one of my guitars. And I think that's cool.  But I'm not EVH or Pat Metheny. I suspect that of one of these cats played Parkers, a lot more clones or wannabe clones or just respectful guitarists who want THAT SOUND would buy Parkers.

Parker for me is both evolution and intelligent design. It makes the best of old construction methods, firmly rooted in woodworking and takes these over the top with modern materials.

But evolution is in the hands of the user. It is the use of the tool which gives it it's purpose. So the question is how do we take this instrument and evolve? Playing Parkers for 16 years and guitar for more than twice as long and I still don't have a full answer.


« Last Edit: March 29, 2010, 11:11:13 AM by Patzag »
Teal Fly Classic 1998 / White Deluxe Hard Tail 1994 /Axe FX II

Intelligent Design? Evolution?

Offline Waggerman

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Intelligent Design? Evolution?
« Reply #167 on: March 29, 2010, 01:21:39 PM »
Hi there

Thanks for the positive and thoughtful responses. I think, as I said, that we all love Parker guitars here. I'd love nothing better than to see David Gilmour or (insert name of favourite/most respected guitarist here) but I find it interesting that they aren't.

Maybe Parker cold consider tweaking the design to see if they can pick any more mainstream names and players (and thanks for not flaming me guys, I meant absolutely no disrespect to Parker's existing endorsers/players with what I wrote). I'm not sure that new models are the way forward - hell, I love the Fly in its various incarnations. I guess I just want to meet potential players (and buyers) part way, WITHOUT losing the inherent beauty of the instrument.

Cheers to all
Waggerman

Intelligent Design? Evolution?

Offline TapGuru

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Intelligent Design? Evolution?
« Reply #168 on: April 11, 2010, 08:51:02 PM »
I have a red parker fly and i was told its the custom edition, is there anyway to tell the difference from classic to custom ?

Intelligent Design? Evolution?

Offline Keith Grasse

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Intelligent Design? Evolution?
« Reply #169 on: October 19, 2011, 03:02:30 PM »
The guitar is a man-made object but that doesn't mean it can't evolve. Many discussions about which guitar is great etc take a relativistic approach: a guitar is considered "great" if it can emulate other "great" guitars. I don't like this approach because it ignores originality in guitar design. The Parker is -- to me -- a different animal from a Fender or a Gibson. And viva la difference. Ken Parker created something unique and for that reason I don't get hung up trying to make comparisons. I just know I like it. I think the relativistic way of thinking is extremely common and most consumers tend to think this way. That's why people like Henry Ford and Steve Jobs were so successful. Henry Ford said: If I asked people what they wanted they would've said "A faster horse." This observation lead Jobs to say: "It's not the consumer's job to know what they want." At first it sounds counterintuitive but on reflection it makes sense. So yes the guitar will continue to change as long as there are people around. Occasionally tho it will change in a big way. Like the Parker.