Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: tremsetter  (Read 3119 times)

Offline audient277

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 128
tremsetter
« on: September 13, 2006, 02:11:35 PM »
I am curious if anyone here has installed a Hipshot Tremsetter on their Parker P(tremolo models)?
 

tremsetter

Offline Musicman1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
tremsetter
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2006, 04:17:09 PM »
I have not on my P44.  Since I do not use the trem, I am actually interested in the best way or device to block the trem.

Musicman1

2005 Parker P44
2002 EB MM Axis Sport
1984 Custom made boutique Strat
1977 Guild D40 NT
1976 Gibson 335 Custom
Wide variety of amps and effects

Musicman1's current arsenal includes:
2007 EB MM JP6, Mystic Dream, piezo, matching headstock, dot inlays
2005 Parker P44, trans red
2002 EB MM Axis Sport  trans gold, rosewood fingerboard, hum/hum, vintage trem, matching headstock
1984 Custom made boutique Strat
1977 Guild D40 NT
1976 Gibson 335 Custom in sunburst
A variety of "tube free", absolutely non-boutique and completely replaceable amps and effects


tremsetter

Offline rt0412

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1584
tremsetter
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2006, 04:36:41 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by audient

I am curious if anyone here has installed a Hipshot Tremsetter on their Parker P(tremolo models)?


No. I have not installed a tremsetter on any P-series guitar simply because I don't own one. If I may ask, what are you going to use the tremsetter for? Stabilize the tremolo?

You might want to take a look at Tremol-No (available at AllParts and other retail stores: Part No. BP-2005_010)



It allows you to turn the tremolo ON (free-floating) or OFF (convert your tremolo essentially to a hardtail) or with the optional Deep-C, convert it into a dive-only tremolo. Advantage: In the OFF or Deep-C mode, your guitar stay in tune if you break a string (just like a Parker Fly or NiteFly).

The P-44 is the closest you can get to a NiteFly-M or NiteFly Mojo (assuming you change the PUs)... with the addition of Tremolo-No, it brings you a lot closer. [:p][;)][8D]
« Last Edit: September 13, 2006, 04:37:40 PM by rt0412 »
 

tremsetter

Offline rt0412

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1584
 

tremsetter

Offline Musicman1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
tremsetter
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2006, 01:07:12 PM »
The Tremel-no website is pretty good. There are 2 vids to watch, one that demos the unit and the other which shows the install.  Id really recommend you watch them before you buy.  

I think Ive talked myself out of one because really its for Floyd Rose or other totally free floating trems. This would never work w/a Fly gtr. Currently, my P 44 trem is set flat to the top of the gtr and is not giving me any tuning issues. I cant think of a single time when I would hit a low open string and play double stops. Also to really make use of it you need the trem cover off all the time which is not do-able w/a Nitefly or a P44 as the same cover also serves as a protection cover for the electronics. You would need to modify the back cover somewhat.

All in all though, if you can use one, its looks to be a well designed and thought-out product.

Musicman1

2005 Parker P44
2002 EB MM Axis Sport
1984 Custom made boutique Strat
1977 Guild D40 NT
1976 Gibson 335 Custom
A variety of amps and effects

Musicman1's current arsenal includes:
2007 EB MM JP6, Mystic Dream, piezo, matching headstock, dot inlays
2005 Parker P44, trans red
2002 EB MM Axis Sport  trans gold, rosewood fingerboard, hum/hum, vintage trem, matching headstock
1984 Custom made boutique Strat
1977 Guild D40 NT
1976 Gibson 335 Custom in sunburst
A variety of "tube free", absolutely non-boutique and completely replaceable amps and effects


tremsetter

Offline rt0412

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1584
tremsetter
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2006, 02:38:44 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Musicman1

The Tremel-no website is pretty good. There are 2 vids to watch, one that demos the unit and the other which shows the install.  Id really recommend you watch them before you buy.  

I think Ive talked myself out of one because really its for Floyd Rose or other totally free floating trems. This would never work w/a Fly gtr. Currently, my P 44 trem is set flat to the top of the gtr and is not giving me any tuning issues. I cant think of a single time when I would hit a low open string and play double stops. Also to really make use of it you need the trem cover off all the time which is not do-able w/a Nitefly or a P44 as the same cover also serves as a protection cover for the electronics. You would need to modify the back cover somewhat.

All in all though, if you can use one, its looks to be a well designed and thought-out product.


The Fly/NiteFly Tremolo is already a free-float/fixed/dive-only unit. Why would anyone wish to put a Tremol-No in a Fly/NiteFly? Unless somebody wants the ability to quickly change from one mode to another, which the Fly/NiteFly tremolo can't do.

Also, the Tremol-No works only with the usual fulcrum style tremolo with coil springs... will never work with a Fly.

It might work with a NiteFly tremolo, but since I have no pressing need to have the ability to quickly change from one mode to another, I won't even attempt it. Maybe somebody else can try it.

I did the same old trick you did on your P-44 with my Fender Strat... lies flat on top of the guitar's body, dive only. It works for me because I have no need to quickly change from dive only to free-floating or true hardtail (blocked tremolo).

But I don't understand why you think the Tremol-No will not work with a normally setup P-44 tremolo which is a Fishman free-floating tremolo unit (TSV PowerBridge, I think). Hold on... it's vague, but I seem to recall that somebody complained about the P-44 tremolo normally setup as pull-down only and can't do pull-ups. Is that true of all P-44s? Why? If all P-44 are setup as dive only then I must agree that the Tremol-No might not be of much help... except if somebody really need true hardtail mode (no pull-ups, no pull-downs).

As far as the back cover issue is concerned the more creative individual will usually find a solution or work-around if he/she really need the Tremol-No's features.
 

tremsetter

Offline Musicman1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
tremsetter
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2006, 04:19:15 PM »
Rt, you referred me to the Treml-no and I took your advice and went to their site.  Initially, I was thinking about converting my P44 into a true hardtail by blocking the trem which I never use.  The new P44 does only go down. I didnt say it wouldnt work with a P series but the point of using this device is to keep the rear trem cover off so you can adjust the device on the go depending on how you want the trem to act.

The newer series P44 has one huge backplate that cover the trem and the electronics.  You would have to severely cut out the back plate so that the Tremol-no could be used on the go unless of course you wanted to just leave the gtr as a hardtail.  In retrospect, the P44 trem does sit flat on the face of the gtr and really does not need, in my opinion and for my playing style and after checking out the Treml-no install, any additional device to block the bridge.  

I appreciated the referral though.



Musicman1

2005 Parker P44
2002 EB MM Axis Sport
1984 Custom made boutique Strat
1977 Guild D40 NT
1976 Gibson 335 Custom
A variety of amps and effects

« Last Edit: September 15, 2006, 04:23:28 PM by Musicman1 »
Musicman1's current arsenal includes:
2007 EB MM JP6, Mystic Dream, piezo, matching headstock, dot inlays
2005 Parker P44, trans red
2002 EB MM Axis Sport  trans gold, rosewood fingerboard, hum/hum, vintage trem, matching headstock
1984 Custom made boutique Strat
1977 Guild D40 NT
1976 Gibson 335 Custom in sunburst
A variety of "tube free", absolutely non-boutique and completely replaceable amps and effects


tremsetter

Offline rt0412

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1584
tremsetter
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2006, 05:38:00 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Musicman1

Rt, you referred me to the Treml-no and I took your advice and went to their site.  Initially, I was thinking about converting my P44 into a true hardtail by blocking the trem which I never use.  The new P44 does only go down. I didnt say it wouldnt work with a P series but the point of using this device is to keep the rear trem cover off so you can adjust the device on the go depending on how you want the trem to act.

The newer series P44 has one huge backplate that cover the trem and the electronics.  You would have to severely cut out the back plate so that the Tremol-no could be used on the go unless of course you wanted to just leave the gtr as a hardtail.  In retrospect, the P44 trem does sit flat on the face of the gtr and really does not need, in my opinion and for my playing style and after checking out the Treml-no install, any additional device to block the bridge.  

I appreciated the referral though.


I don't recall referring you to the Tremol-No directly. The Tremol-No came as a response to audient's question about the tremsetter. Then I posted some more Tremol-No related sites. Of course, I'm aware that some readers of this thread will check out the sites, naturally... and you did.

Anyway, we're using the same workaround to tame the fulcrum style tremolo (set as dive only) and for our purposes, seems to be working good enough. However, that's not a true blocked (hardtail) mode.

Anybody who wants to block the tremolo so it acts like a hardtail can use a piece or two pieces of wood or just use a Tremolo-no (or other trem devices out there). I just happen to pick Tremol-No because I think it's a high quality, well made item.

As for the tremolo cover issue, putting a big gaping hole on it or just completely removing it just to change bridge modes in mere seconds is not, I think the main objective of the Tremol-No.

Like the Parker tremolo, the Tremol-No's main objective is to provide the three trem modes. However, I believe that if there's a contest between the Parker tremolo and a Tremol-No equipped tremolo as to what system can change the fastest with the back cover on, the winner will be Tremol-No. Even if people can rig-up the back covers of both systems with some custom holes or windows that can be opened or closed, the Tremol-No will still win. Of course, with the back covers off, it's still Tremol-No, doing the change in mere seconds.

For those who leave the back cover off, these are extreme players who need to change their trem modes on the fly. Heck, if I need to change the trem modes, I'll be in heaven already if I can do it in minutes. With our way of setting the trem plate flat on top of the body, it will probably take hours to go from dive-only to free-floating.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2006, 05:43:19 PM by rt0412 »
 

tremsetter

Offline rt0412

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1584
tremsetter
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2006, 11:42:31 AM »
John (jwrooker) has successfuly installed Tremolo-No in his Fender Deluxe Power Strat (with Fishman PowerBridge Tremolo). He said it did improve the sustain and tone when it's set to the Hardtail mode. It also improved the piezo sound.

Since the P-44 is using a similar Fishman PowerBridge, the Tremol-No will probably work with it as well. The only difficulty I see in installing the Tremol-No in a P-44 is in setting-up it's tremolo from a dive-only to the usual free-floating mode to take advantage of having all three modes available (free-foating/dive-only/hardtail).
« Last Edit: September 29, 2006, 11:43:33 AM by rt0412 »