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Author Topic: For the gigging musician  (Read 2922 times)

Offline loumt123

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For the gigging musician
« on: February 24, 2007, 08:46:51 AM »
My guitar teacher taught me this cool trick that comes in handy. So you're in a cover band or something of the like. Your vocalist can't sing in this key as her voice strains (I know...tired but true). You need to communicate the correct key and progression to your bandmates.

   First comes the key. Put the amount of fingers up for the number of sharps, or point them down for the number of flats for the key. You can use both hands. C is a closed fist.

   For the progression your right hand communicates the roman numerals of the chord. 6 and 7 are 1 or 2 fingers pointing down.  for example a 1 6 2 5 progression. One finger up, followed by one finger pointing down, followed by two fingers up, followed by 5 fingers up.


    It's nothing too special but I've seen it used live and it seems to work.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2007, 08:47:53 AM by loumt123 »
 

For the gigging musician

Offline Yoyo

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For the gigging musician
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2007, 05:35:04 PM »
Good idea though over here holding up two fingers can get you into trouble.
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For the gigging musician

Offline David Tomkins

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For the gigging musician
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2007, 10:21:28 AM »
that method involves learning something.  i've always thought that "....NO!  3 frets UP"  works better!

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For the gigging musician

Offline JSanta

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For the gigging musician
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2007, 10:20:10 PM »
Haha, that's what we used to do at shows David, but out language was usually a bit more profane and sometimes ended with an angry me haha.


/jim

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For the gigging musician

Offline Lwinn171

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For the gigging musician
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2007, 12:48:27 AM »
This method would cause at least one of my bandmates to steal second, the others would probably bunt. Great musicians to a soul, but they don't think in terms of the number of accidentals in a key. Must be a crack group that can manage such a thing. We usually use our ears and some direct line of sight (fretboard), and of course, lots of practice. I wouldn't let a singer decide to change keys on the spot. It would be rehearsed in the proper key (whatever that may be, or god forbid, B flat), and some simple notation on the setlist would clue you in to key. Seriously, they'd never get it, and neither would I.[:D][:D][:D]



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« Last Edit: March 03, 2007, 12:49:30 AM by Lwinn171 »

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For the gigging musician

Offline bno

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For the gigging musician
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2007, 02:14:48 PM »
I've heard that Paul Schafer can direct the whole band with hand signals that indicate keys and chord changes and they can do it on the fly.  Its musician's sign language.

Hand signals are great.  Raised fist for the end of a song, dynamics signals, cues for solos, etc.  What Lou is talking about is pretty sophisticated and works well when your players are trained and can think of music as relationships, i.e., I IV V vs. C F G.  Like everything else, it takes practice.
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For the gigging musician

Offline thegrigg

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For the gigging musician
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2007, 02:47:23 PM »
My guys aren't that smart. Me either. I wish the bass player would look up once in a while.
All in all we have a great time! If not perfect.
The worste thing a band can be is boring!
Just a thought...
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For the gigging musician

Offline jamrcat

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For the gigging musician
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2007, 08:41:00 PM »
My wife and I improvise alot while playing (She's a drummer). I never realized how much we communicate with nods and gestures until one of our singers pointed out, she had broken the code! [:D] I never started out thinking of a code, but 30 years of making music together has it's benefits! [;)]

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« Last Edit: August 06, 2007, 08:42:58 PM by jamrcat »
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