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Author Topic: Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week  (Read 3942 times)

Offline Strandwolf

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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week
« on: September 24, 2007, 11:24:19 PM »
back in September of 1958, in the USA:

  Just for fun, Billboard’s Top – 10 this date in 1958 looked like this:

1)   Nel Blu Dipinto Di Blu (Volare)   Domenico Modugno
2)   Bird Dog                                  The Everly Bros.
3)   It’s All In The Game                  Tommy Edwards
4)   Little Star                                The Elegants
5)   Rock-In-Robin                          Bobby Day
6)   Just A Dream                           Jimmy Clanton
7)   Tears On My Pillow                   Little Anthony & The Imperials
8)   Susie Darlin’                            Robin Luke
9)   Born Too Late                          Poni Tails
10) Devoted To You                       The Everly Bros.                  

Funny thing is that although I was only 9 at the time, I remember every one of these songs very well, except, paradoxically, #10, by the famous Everlys. At least half of these particular tunes are huge classics, I mean beloved by millions of folks, and in my opinion deservedly so. "Musicianship" may have become more sophisticated or highly skilled, but when was the last time there was such quality on a week's top 10?  The only ones I can live without are #9 and #10--and that one possibly only because I'm not familiar with it....
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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline Yoyo

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« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2007, 10:26:36 PM »
Didn't all of us fiftysomethings grow up in a golden age? Not only for music as the above post proves. Remember all those funky little hippychicks saying make love not war when the pill had just come out! Ooh my aching blood pressure.
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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline Lwinn171

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« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2007, 12:00:31 AM »
We are, in fact, lucky to have been born when we were. The past 50 years have seen such an advance in so many ways... We will go down in history as having lived in a very interesting time of profound change and growth as a species. I've only been around for 40 years, but it's amazing the changes I've seen, musically and otherwise. I was weened on New Wave, Punk, Prog rock and what they now call Classic rock. But as a kid, I heard much from the past... The 50's and 60's, and still find myself using chord progressions from a well bygone time... Those tunes were great for a reason, just as valid as anything since. Everything influences everything. The modern (last 50 years +/-) aesthetic in music deems it so, and so be it...



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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2007, 07:24:14 AM »
I'm just a year younger that Strandwolf, but I would argue that the top 10 songs from the 60s are a far superior crop of songs. (Beatles, Stones, Temptations, Four Tops, Stevie Wonder, etc.) I love the Everly Brothers, but Nel Blu Dipinto Di Blu and for my money It's All In The Game are just, pardon  me, square and fuddy duddy.  By the way, check out the Louvin Brothers, a major influence of the Everly's.
Yes, I'm very happy that I was born in 1950, grew up in the post pill, pre plague era, when men and women were good friends and had sex constantly.
As a professional composer, I'm also thrilled that I was able to retain control of my music, something that no artists from the 50s could do.  I also have a great deal of respect for artists who wrote their own music, something that didn't happen in the 50s.
I mean absolutely no disrespect to anyone of my age, but when I read about how great is was to be born in our era, I tend to ask if this statement was written from a rocking chair.  It reminds of the emails I get from my wife's 85 year old father.... Remember when milk was delivered in bottles and doctors make house calls, etc.
We're all lucky to have been born in any era and we'll always bring our influences with us.  Stay young, have fun. It's always nice to reflect on the past.  As Yoyo says, "the only thing that exists is this moment now."
« Last Edit: September 26, 2007, 07:25:03 AM by prjacobs »
 

Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline BrainWorm

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« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2007, 02:12:16 AM »
Civilizations rise and fall. Countries rise and fall. To be on the downward fall is not a good place to be. America has had a few hundred year rise so a lot of people think that upward and onward is only the natural order of things. Maybe the fuddie duddies have noticed something. Turns out the fuddie duddies of past civilizations were right. It would be interesting if someone did an anaylsis of the timeline of fuddie duddie statements and the decline of the civilization or country.

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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline Yoyo

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« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2007, 04:08:05 AM »
I've got to step in to defend the song "Volare". I think it's my favourite Italian song.
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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline Bill

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« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2007, 06:58:18 AM »
"Volare" ?

Are you serious or kidding?

Unfortunatly Yo, over here it just reminds us of a cheezy car commercial. They made an chrisler car ad jingle out of it years ago.

BTW, what is corinthian leather?

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« Last Edit: September 27, 2007, 06:59:06 AM by Bill »
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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline 908ssp

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« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2007, 10:31:55 AM »
Appreciation of music is fundamentally a subjective endeavor so like an anthropologist one must look at the music from the perspective of the times and environment. If you can't for some reason appreciate a music for what it is at least appreciate it for what it was to those that did like it.

That said Volare is a terrific song I can still sing. But my favorite song from 58 was Chantilly Lace by Big Bopper [I think]. In the early 60s I got The Greatest Hits of 1958 album from my moms collection I played that many times.

From another perspective the rapid evolution of music through the 60s is I think unprecedented. Maybe because that era is so well documented or maybe things like popular music just moves in spurts. Also at that time music was much less fragmented and this sharing and cross pollination you could say added to the rapid change. As music got pidgin holed into smaller segments the isolation that the music grew up in made it less accessible with less cross over appeal.

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« Last Edit: September 27, 2007, 10:32:49 AM by 908ssp »
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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline Yoyo

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« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2007, 04:42:40 PM »
I think you have a decidedly valid point there Alex. Thinking back there was less pidgeonholing happening in music and cross pollination happened left and right. For me I'd say the decade of choice occured from '63 to '73. And it wasn't the usual case of prefering your own era. I think by now any objective analysis of history and particularly the history of music has singled out that era as something special, a sort of brief renaissance.
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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2007, 10:49:01 PM »
I think that as music lovers, we can find wonderful music from any era.  I do think that our culture became more self examining and introspective in the 60s and music and art reflected that.  A more personalized style of songwriting developed, perhaps starting with Dylan who got the Beatles out of Yeah, yeah, yeah and into Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt. Pepper, etc.  When I first heard Eleanor Rigby I couldn't believe that the most popular rock band in the world had written that! I agree with Yoyo about the renaissance of the 60s.  Our society was turned on it's ear and will never be the same. I mean, civil rights, women's rights, the aforementioned free love in an era of birth control.... Men growing up in the 50s had to buy Playboy to see even half naked women.  I find it sad to see how far to the right that our country has moved, but despite itself, creativity is a progressive impulse and will win out in the end.  A bit off topic perhaps.... Sorry.  Hey, remember when people played music, not machines.  That was fun.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2007, 10:50:49 PM by prjacobs »
 

Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline BrainWorm

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« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2007, 03:12:46 AM »
http://www.preterhuman.net/texts/lyrics_and_music_related/unsorted_lyrics/alley_oop.txt

I liked this song, Alley Oop, oop, oop-oop. Along with a lot of others.

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The Purple People Eater.

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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2007, 11:19:59 AM »
Each "generation" (they come along every 2 years or so now) has its idols and favorite tunes and even music genre, based at least somewhat on when their adolescent hormones kicking in. There's the Beatles generation, The Monkees gen, Kiss, punk rockers, power poppers, hair metal, death metal, emo, whatever. Brain chemistry locks you in[8D].

Good point about the most adventurous music of any decade being perhaps 1963-73, rather than, say, "The Sixties" or "The Eighties".

As a 45 collector, I've come to the conclusion that I could exist fairly happily with just my favorite 2500 tunes from just a single year, say 1961 or 1963, a couple of years most would (incorrectly IMO) think were fairly drab as far as song creation goes. Some of the stuff, by no means a lot of it, but enough nevertheless, that was released but never even bubbled beneath the Billboard Hot 100, is as great as any of the songs we were likely to hear on the hit parade. Talent and quality does not inevitably rise to the top.

Of course the collector is a snob, and some of the raving over the ignored obscurities might well be elitism....
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Offline Yoyo

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« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2007, 06:38:40 PM »
On the one hand ditto to the above, but on the other music has been taking a decided turn for the better in the last few years. I like most bands making a serious attempt lately. Witness events like Glastonbury, reams of talent.
But I do know where you're coming from S/W. The talent in early recordings sounds so fresh now because it's honest and beautifully under produced. There's still plenty to be discovered in the past as well.
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Dig the Pop Top Ten For This Week

Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2007, 09:30:38 AM »
Yoyo,
It's interesting about production values in, say, the 50s and production values now.  On the one hand you have a form inventing itself on the fly, (couldn't resist the Parker reference), and you also have musicians and arrangers that came from disciplines requiring great reading skills and playing skills on a day to day basis.  Now please, let's not get on my case about comparing skills; what I mean is that charts with notes had to be realized and played correctly, immediately.  The concept of spending months recording an album didn't exit. Orchestrating with midi samples with unlimited tracks requires no balancing skills.  Recording live to mono with a large amount of musicians is a much more musical undertaking and required charts with built in dynamics.  In a sense they had to be pre-mixed.
To me, many of these seemingly simple arrangements are quite advanced.  Even when the Beatles started recording, they'd do two 3 hour sessions and the album was done.  The "engineers" at Abby Road wore white lab coats.
That being said, we have to continually give credit to all of the amazing music that's written and recorded now.
I know that the impulse for "they just don't write em like they used to" is from loving reflection, and I'm sorry if my initial reaction was a little crabby.  But there's an irreverent part of me that feels like I'm listening to a bunch of old people. Yawn...  Let's keep up with the times.  Incredible music is constantly coming out.
 

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Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2007, 11:22:58 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by prjacobs


That being said, we have to continually give credit to all of the amazing music that's written and recorded now.
I know that the impulse for "they just don't write em like they used to" is from loving reflection, and I'm sorry if my initial reaction was a little crabby.  But there's an irreverent part of me that feels like I'm listening to a bunch of old people. Yawn...  Let's keep up with the times.  Incredible music is constantly coming out.



You bring up a good point (which I didn't quote here) about the way much popular music used to be recorded, though I think you overly simplified the process. For instance when Elvis recorded for RCA in Nashville, he did over 20 takes of Hound Dog, and the sound engineers weren't on the nod--hell, they'd paid $30,000 for this boy, an unheard of sum back then, and careers were on the line. It was a miracle that his sidemen Scotty, Bill, and DJ were allowed to record with them, what with Chet Atkins, etc., standing around.
Now I am old, you young whippersnapper, old and wise, but always willing to learn. Just what is some of this "incredible music" that is "constantly coming out"? About the only instrument most of these young talents have mastered is...the radio. Furthermore, what's "incredible" about most of their 'product' is that it is classified 'music'.
Sorry to induce more yawning on your part. Unless you pull my coat to something I really ENJOY listening to rather than the usual hip and trendy horsebolagna, I'll keep my head back, oh so way back, in the sixties and seventies for the most part.[^]Gee, this rant this garnered me my second star!
Edited on Oct. 4 to brag that my third forum posts star has just shown up, a mere week later! If only one could acquire fine guitars at that clip.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2007, 12:51:29 PM by Strandwolf »
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