Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Giant Steps Analysis  (Read 9464 times)

Offline prjacobs

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
Giant Steps Analysis
« Reply #45 on: March 18, 2008, 08:23:08 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by BrainWorm

Which G minor scale would you play over the G minor chord?

"Brainverms come crawling and creeping and eat you when you're sleeping."



I'm not sure if I understand your question.  It seems to me that with Giant Steps, as with jazz in general, the addition of Maj.7ths, 9ths, 11ths, 13ths, the alteration of 5ths, 9ths, etc., provide us with more harmonic material than just a major or minor triad. Not just more triadic choices, but many others. As to which scale to play over a g minor chord; it might depend on how the g minor chord is placed in a song.  What is the melody note when that chord occurs.  Is the g minor chord, say, going to a C7 and are we in the key of F. Maybe the g minor chord is the IV chord and you're in d minor.  That might suggest  using an f sharp as a "lower neighbor" to refer it back to the tonic key.  Is the melody going up or coming down.  Is the song in the process of creating tension or resolving it.  To me, those factors and many more would influence what I'd play over a g minor chord.
 

Giant Steps Analysis

Offline BrainWorm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2007
Giant Steps Analysis
« Reply #46 on: March 19, 2008, 03:33:31 AM »
It's so late at night I don't have time to try to figure these things out.

"Brainverms come crawling and creeping and eat you when you're sleeping."
"Brainverms come crawling and creeping and eat you when you're sleeping."