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Author Topic: Rhythmic Mystic  (Read 2098 times)

Offline Bill

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Rhythmic Mystic
« on: March 26, 2008, 07:06:50 PM »
Its kind of strange but interesting. It is John McLaughlin   after all.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yK7hsvdjHwg

A few Flys in my soup
« Last Edit: March 26, 2008, 08:11:17 PM by Bill »
A few Flys in my soup

Rhythmic Mystic

Offline danjazzny

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Rhythmic Mystic
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2008, 10:56:11 PM »
It's interesting but way over my head. Too much for my little brain to handle. [xx(][:I]

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Rhythmic Mystic

Offline prjacobs

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Rhythmic Mystic
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2008, 06:16:25 PM »
When I studied ear training as a little kid, there were certain parts of familiar songs that the "tonally challenged" would be given to learn intervals.  For example, the first 2 notes of "My Bonnie Lies Over The Ocean," are a major 6th.  Since people knew the songs, it was a way of associating the correct intervals with what you heard.  It seems to me that these words function the same way as rhythmic ear trainers.  I guess that one would become so familiar with the cadence of those words, that you'd develop a real rhythmic affinity.  I guess if you're really interested in exploring that direction it would be cool.  I believe it was Carl Seashore who wrote about the different parts of music that attract children and adults.  Some, like John, (at least in what we see here), identify with rhythm, some with melody, some with harmony, some with tempo, some with different tonal colors.... And some play drums.... Just kidding....
Obviously, in Indian music, there are so many complex rhythms to be mastered and I'm sure this system has proven to be effective for perhaps centuries.
 

Rhythmic Mystic

Offline uburoibob

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Rhythmic Mystic
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2008, 05:37:54 PM »
I saw Ravi Shankar in the late 1960s and during his show, he explained the basic principles of rhythm as they applied to the ragas he was playing. At one point he and Allah Raka were sort of scatting rhythms out and it was fascinating. Konokol is certainly something worth pursuing - if there's one thing that most guitar players could benefit from it would be a wider rhythmic vocabulary. Watching McLaughlin reminds me why I think he is just so far ahead of just about every other guitar player...

Bob

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Rhythmic Mystic

Offline Lwinn171

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Rhythmic Mystic
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2008, 01:03:08 AM »
Nice... can't say I could do that, but I can feel what he's doing. Honestly, that must surely be over all our heads. Very complex rhythmic stuff. Anyone ever listen to "Redunzle" by Zappa. His band does some very far out stuff with rhythm on that track. From the album "Studio Tan" ...

Anyway thanks for the link, enjoyed that.

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