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Author Topic: Shred piano  (Read 2744 times)

Offline bno

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« on: March 31, 2008, 03:28:07 PM »
You might find this amusing.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bFwDkh3sW0&NR=1
'94 Fly Deluxe
Listen first, then play.

Shred piano

Offline Paul Marossy

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« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2008, 03:44:52 PM »

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2008, 03:59:22 PM »
I so lame, I don't know how to upload the youtube link, but if you go to youtube and search for Schumann Toccata, (it's actually op. 7), you'll find an example of a piano piece that is sort of Scott Joplin on steroids.  This Russian pianist, Berezovsky makes it look semple, but your fingers totally die when trying to play this.
The first time I heard this music, it reminded me of a rag....

« Last Edit: March 31, 2008, 04:06:17 PM by prjacobs »
 

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Offline bno

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« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2008, 06:23:25 PM »
You mean:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhV8G3pZh5k

whoa, mind numbing performance.  I got a cramp just watching/listening.

I just thought the speed at which Miller was playing the Joplin was absurd, nearly comedic.  

'94 Fly Deluxe
Listen first, then play.

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2008, 06:54:45 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by bno

You mean:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhV8G3pZh5k

whoa, mind numbing performance.  I got a cramp just watching/listening.

I just thought the speed at which Miller was playing the Joplin was absurd, nearly comedic.  



'94 Fly Deluxe
Listen first, then play.



Yes, that's the one I saw.  The Joplin rag made me think of that piece.  What's amazing is that his right hand is constantly playing 2 notes at once.  His hands are so relaxed, it's a joke.  The chops/strength needed for that is beyond belief and he makes it look like he's playing Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.

On the other hand, the Miller performance is more show biz than virtuosity.  The right hand is very easy; it's the fast stride in the left hand that's more impressive to me.  But still very doable.

It you have a chance, check out a Russian pianist named Richter playing Chopin Etude Op.10, #4.  Blinding speed with perfect control.
They say that he practiced 10 hours and ran 10 miles every day!  For decades....
It's interesting to look at the different skill sets needed on the one hand to improvise and on the other hand to play written music that is impossibly difficult.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2008, 06:55:33 PM by prjacobs »
 

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Offline Picks

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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2008, 02:50:18 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by bno

You might find this amusing.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bFwDkh3sW0&NR=1

'94 Fly Deluxe
Listen first, then play.




This, requires no explanation, especially if you are familiar with him as a guitarist. Pretty incredible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4A2vG0GsG54

Sometimes, it's not how fast you play, but what you play fast.
 

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2008, 06:25:26 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Picks

quote:
Originally posted by bno

You might find this amusing.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bFwDkh3sW0&NR=1

'94 Fly Deluxe
Listen first, then play.




This, requires no explanation, especially if you are familiar with him as a guitarist. Pretty incredible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4A2vG0GsG54

Sometimes, it's not how fast you play, but what you play fast.



Very cool!
 

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Offline ckyvick

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« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2008, 04:19:52 AM »
its never been about playing fast, its about what you play...that should be the concern of musicians. what they are playing, not how fast they can play it. of course most people just need to sit down with a metronome for a while each day and that would clean up a lot of things.
 

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Offline Yoyo

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« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2008, 07:27:56 AM »
I couldn't agree more ckyvick. I offer this example. It's Akiko Suwanai becoming the youngest ever winner of the Tchaikovsky Competition. Both the composition and the performance have it all. Be warned she doesn't start playing until 04.18.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2onBnMHLNE
The only thing that exists is this moment now.

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Offline bno

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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2008, 08:43:40 AM »
Some people watch the dancers and some people see the choreography.  Some people watch the musician and some people listen to the music.  I offered up the Joplin for it's amusement value not as a virtuoso performance, but as a tease "over performance".  That stride left hand is mad dog crazy.

The Berezovsky is fascinating partially due to the fluid ease with which he spills out an incredibly difficult technical performance (i.e., David Tyree making a clutch catch with his head) aside from his very musical performance.  This ease allows the musicality to come out.

I think Shawn Lane's discussion on speed (found next to the video of his extraordinary piano playing) is a valid point of view - rather than slowly building up to speed, take your playing to a certain comfortable point and then leap ahead and work at just cleaning it up.  

And the Paganini.  Beautiful.  Thanks, Yoyo.

I'm not a real expert on any of this stuff.  I just find it interesting and thought provoking.  And I love what everyone has thrown into the stew.
'94 Fly Deluxe
Listen first, then play.

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2008, 09:18:31 AM »
I'm performing a Liszt Etude this Friday as part of a New York University piano performance and technique class.  Just me and a bunch of Asian, 20 something girls.  There is, (for me), one very hard section where the left hand and right hand leap multiple octaves in opposite directions, while playing chords that stretch an octave, interspersed with really fast parallel double octave runs...I haven't looked at Shawn Lane's discussion on speed, but just reading bno's comment above, I basically agree with this strategy.  All of the slow practice in the world will not build up the fast twitch nerve reactions that you'll need for the fast movement.  The key, at least for me, is to build up to that comfortable point Shawn's talking about, with no strain and be able to play at what you consider to be a comfortable speed, over and over again, without mistakes.  If you start off too fast, you can't play with feel and you're too tense. As one example of a practice technique, I play only with the thumbs of both hands, because feeling where the thumbs jump to, brings the rest of the hand with it.  Basically, find every element required to do what you want, isolate it and work in it by itself in addition to practicing the whole passage. Also, be realistic.  If you're not able to clean up what you want to at a high speed, slow it down and work from there. I have a feeling that I've played far too much lead guitar and rock keyboards to ever be as mistake free as the young classical piano majors, but that's the good thing about playing Liszt; You can get away with a few mistakes.
I would also recommend tackling whatever difficult passage you're trying to play and look at the musical statement it's making. Concentrate on the meaning of the passage and the technique will respond.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2008, 09:18:56 AM by prjacobs »
 

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Offline Yoyo

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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2008, 05:51:36 PM »
How the hell you're going to concentrate on a demanding piece of Liszt with a gaggle of young Asian girls surrounding you I do not know. Seriously though Paul I'd love it if you could post some of your keyboard playing.
The only thing that exists is this moment now.

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Offline prjacobs

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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2008, 07:52:31 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Yoyo

How the hell you're going to concentrate on a demanding piece of Liszt with a gaggle of young Asian girls surrounding you I do not know. Seriously though Paul I'd love it if you could post some of your keyboard playing.

The only thing that exists is this moment now.



These girls critique my playing every week, which is why I took the class.  They all know the hard parts and where I'm likely to screw up;especially since they've heard me screw up the same things for weeks.[:)] Being forced to perform has definitely improved my focus, and listening to the 2 professors guide the other players as well as myself, has helped me a lot. After one performance of the Liszt, one girl thought it would be fun to have my body for a while, because I'm so much bigger and stronger than she is.  I told her it sounded kinky, but that I was game.
As of now, I haven't recorded any of my performances, but I probably should.