Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Groundhog Day  (Read 1734 times)

Offline prjacobs

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
Groundhog Day
« on: May 08, 2008, 08:39:32 AM »
I think that we all can use some feedback/lessons from a GOOD teacher, otherwise we are in danger of just repeating what we know - forever.
I have a friend who's been a rock star in Denmark for decades who never took a lesson, doesn't read music and totally disagrees with me, but I just enjoy learning new stuff.  And unless you become a star, if you want a career in music, the more you know, the more you'll work. I don't care how advanced you are; an objective listener, viewer and instructor can only help.
I was at the top of my game as a rock guitarist in the 60s and 70s and then I took jazz lessons with a great teacher, Alan Hanlon.  Alan was Benny Goodman's guitarist, among other things, and in 3 months he taught me all I ever needed to know about jazz chords and comping. A great teacher can cut out the useless information and give you the essential tools.
It's like having a great coach as an athlete.  What can be better than learning more about something you love from an expert!
Now, I'm taking classical piano with Miyoko Lotto, a wonderful teacher and person, who's on the highlight reel of my life, and I feel like I'm at a piano finishing school.  It's great to feel that there's always so much room for improvement and to see progress.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2008, 08:41:09 AM by prjacobs »
 

Groundhog Day

Offline simonlock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4374
Groundhog Day
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2008, 12:13:14 PM »
I agree. The main reason I'm so hooked on music is that the possibility for growth is only limited by my enthusiasm and desire. I'd rather be respected as a musician and struggle to make some of my bills than to be a flash in the pan and marvelled at like a circus act. But some were cut out to be more entertainer than self driven students.

As a teacher I saw the limitations that most instructors will be faced with. Their students. I didn't have 1 student that was challenging to teach or could even be considered intermediate. To be able to grasp and make use of some of the concepts I know are useful would take the most gifted to make use of it. Paul you are one of those most gifted players and this teacher must have years of practice teaching interm-advanced players. Such a small percentage of teachers are even qualified to teach beyond the beginner stages. Maybe in some areas they can but they can't put all the pieces together. The guy I was teaching for couldn't comprehend anything past pentatonic and major scales and couldnt' play to changes. He had a bag of tricks and relied on his ear(which was pretty good and he had some great tricks) but it's a little hard to explain things in terms of your own perception of sounds. Alan Hanlon sounds like the ideal teacher for me. I eat stuff up and love to learn intensely and sans fluff.

Simon
Vancouver,BC
A Whole Mess of Flys and I Love Them ALL!!!!!
 

Groundhog Day

Offline Bill

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4839
  • What is this ?
Groundhog Day
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2008, 07:54:20 PM »
I just started taking again. I'm in my second month at 1/2 hour a week. This guy is awesome. He is formally trained and still has a soul. He can play anything and relates it to others very well.

Although he can do all that weird jazz sh*t and shred with the best too, he mostly is a blues man. He has been in some successful bands and now does solo gigs with his looper. He is 80% acoustic, 20 % strat.

He doesn't know Flys personally and doesn't like them for one reason. No neck markers. That wouldn't bother him as a player--he could play blindfolded and doesnt even look anyway. But it makes his job harder as a teacher. Simon can empathise I'm sure.

Anyway I thought it was interesting when he told me he went down to the New Orleans Jazz fest last week and learned a lot.

No matter how good you are, he said, there is plenty to learn from others. That is my kind of teacher. He is very expensive and worth every penny.





A few Flys in my soup
A few Flys in my soup

Groundhog Day

Offline simonlock

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4374
Groundhog Day
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2008, 09:44:39 PM »
Putting out a few hundred dollars a season for good lessons is pretty cheep. I'm looking at schools right now and tuition in any US school is just out of this world. Sounds like you got a great teacher Bill and yeah I can relate with the fret markers. May be something for Parker to spend some  R+D time, making color epoxy markers.

Simon
Vancouver,BC
A Whole Mess of Flys and I Love Them ALL!!!!!