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Offline simonlock

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« on: June 19, 2008, 04:22:31 PM »
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« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 06:41:12 PM by simonlock »
 

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Offline laughinglarry

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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2008, 04:44:28 PM »
Simon,

This is my favorite piece that I've seen/ heard of yours.  But I'm not so sure about it being "the groove in your hands".  

It sounds more to me like you were doing a better job, or concentrating more, on listening. Your technique is always stellar, but I've heard some of your clips where it sounds a little disjointed from the music.  I understand wanting to get that "Fresh" take, where everything's not rehearsed to death.  But rather than attributing any previous shortcomings to anything to do with your hands, I'd simply suggest that you are hearing the backing tracks better.

I hope this is taken the way it's intended.  I think you're tremendously talented, and I'm quite envious of your ability.  And I think that, whether it's a "hand" or "ears" issue, you've broken through to another level.

Kudos my friend!  [:p][:D][;)]

Larry

2000 Fly Deluxe Single 2, 2000 Fly Stealth, '97 Fly Deluxe (with GK-2A), '07 Steinberger GM-7TA, '89 Strat Plus, '92 Les Paul Custom, Ibanez Silver Series (Strat), Epiphone Dot, '65 Mustang, Yamaha BB3000AF, Peavey Foundation, Hamer Cruisebass
http://www.myspace.com/larrysmithmusic
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Offline danjazzny

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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2008, 05:26:35 PM »
Sounds good Simon! Your fingers are just a blur in parts of that video!! [:0] [:D]

'05 Mojo++'95 Deluxe++'98 Classic++'97 Alex Artist ++'99 Simonized Artist++'97 Custom Red Artist++Line 6 Amps
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Offline simonlock

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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2008, 06:59:38 PM »
Thanks guys. Larry, there's probably some truth to what you're saying but I've always felt that what came out was never what was intended. The way I saw it was I'd think about what I wanted to hear, figure out what fingers were going to do it, and then try to aim for the beat. It just doesn't work that way. The brain processes information too slow so I was very often behind and trying to constantly catch up. Hence the disjointed sound. Now instead I let my hands feel groovy and it's all second nature. Pretty cool. I do indeed feel like I've broken through a plateau it's very exciting.

Here's a little dance number. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nuCfajHNfo

Simon
Vancouver,BC
A Whole Mess of Flys and I Love Them ALL!!!!!
 

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Offline uburoibob

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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2008, 08:28:18 PM »
Your technique, limberness and muscle are certainly up to snuff on all the videos, Simon. Your woodshedding is paying off in that department. If I may make a suggestion to the musical part of the performance, I'd concentrate on playing modes over chord changes and specifically paying attention to transitional passages between chords. I hear you playing pretty fast and loose with keys and melody here, though, and with just a little tweaking you could be playing musically in the pocket as strongly as you are mechanically. I'd suggest finding a tonal center and studying how the notes fit the chord structures. I think if you pushed yourself in that direction you'd be ready to take on just about anybody. What really helped me was repetitively studying II V I changes. I would recommend the Jimmy Bruno instructional DVD. It's jazz, but it's also just great for getting your brain thinking about changes and where to go. As you said, the brain doesn't think as fast as your fingers can be trained to go, so it's really a matter of direct finger to ear connection with your brain kind of conducting. Doing a study like this, move things - like a single note or two or three - half a step up or down in the same lines and patterns you are used to playing quickly and see how they affect your ears. Does it sound sweeter? More outside? If it leads it outside, what do you do to take the rest of it out? Or in?

This is where it starts to be fun and creative. Most people never get the mechanical part down. You've got that in spades.

Bob

2001 Parker Fly Single 2 Silver  â€¢ 1997 Parker Fly Concert Burnt Butterscotch  â€¢  1999 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail Butterscotch  â€¢  1998 Fly Classic in Transparent Dark Blue  â€¢  1998 Fly Classic in Cherry Red with DiBurro Roland Mod •  http://bobmartin1111.com
« Last Edit: June 19, 2008, 08:29:59 PM by uburoibob »
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Offline simonlock

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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2008, 11:37:50 PM »
THanks Bob. Yeah it's pretty loose and many times you can hear me hunting for a suitable tone. I have no idea what the key is and most of these tracks actually modulate or borrow chords from other scales so it's hard to follow the curve balls. I like the Jazz approach and am familiar but need to actually get used to instantly switching between many scales and modes without having to think about it. I've been working at it lately and I'm using visualization instead of trying to watch my hands moving in and out of the patterns. With visualization it's much easier to see the "big picture" when it comes to fretboard mapping. I'm not sure who I'm going to work on this with but I'm considering getting a lesson from Greg Howe. Band in a box helps because I can delegate what chords I'm going to use instead of having to analyze a standard. They can sometimes be just too complex and I'm lazy lol.

I'm starting to feel more confident and all the kind words are amazing to hear. Thank you all.

Simon
Vancouver,BC
A Whole Mess of Flys and I Love Them ALL!!!!!
 

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Offline uburoibob

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« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2008, 06:52:54 AM »
Cool Simon. I can't wait to hear the results of applying musicality to all of this. As you'll learn when you get the hang of using notes from the right scales,  you don't need to be so concerned about switching modes as training your ear. There are a lot of notes common to the scales and modes, so it's not so much thinking about switching the modes as it is about hearing what should happen.

Practicing what sounds good over a chord, then over the next chord, then how to best transition that is a lot like learning a language. First you learn to say the words, then how to spell them, then how to use them in a sentence, then a paragraph, etc. But as an English speaking adult, you don't find yourself spelling out words as you say them, and you don't worry about sentence structure or charting a paragraph in speech. Or, in written words. After a while, that part comes naturally. Same with improvisation - it's gotta be like composing on the fly (pardon the pun).

I would suggest dividing your practice into two - one session to keep developing the mechanics, and one to start developing the content. I'd start with the content and scales, and not worry about speed and dexterity, or you'll get hung up on that. Then practice the mechanics and try to apply the results of what you are learning in the content part. In the beginning, just let the mechanical part be what you are doing now. But as the content part starts to find its way into your lexicon, it will inform the mechanical part. Eventually, you'll find yourself to be heading toward a goal of being totally free of patterns, able to offer up musically rich passages at the speed of light.

I think that's what separates Guthry (sorry I don't remember his name - is it Govin?) from the rest. His musical vocabulary is exceptionally rich AND he shreds it up like a madman. I can listen to him all day because he speaks music in a coherent way rather than selecting music to fit whatever patterns he's learned.

To my ears, Simon, you are so close to being at that level. Now you've gotta apply the music part to all of this and you'll be a monster.

Bob



2001 Parker Fly Single 2 Silver  â€¢ 1997 Parker Fly Concert Burnt Butterscotch  â€¢  1999 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail Butterscotch  â€¢  1998 Fly Classic in Transparent Dark Blue  â€¢  1998 Fly Classic in Cherry Red with DiBurro Roland Mod •  http://bobmartin1111.com
1999 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail Butterscotch -   2000 Fly Standard Classic in Cherry Red - http://bobmartin1111.com

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Offline simonlock

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« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2008, 10:29:40 AM »
quote:
I'd start with the content and scales, and not worry about speed and dexterity, or you'll get hung up on that.


Ha ha! Indeed I would and often do.

quote:
To my ears, Simon, you are so close to being at that level. Now you've gotta apply the music part to all of this and you'll be a monster.


What an amazing feeling to get a compliment like that Bob. To even put me in the same sport as Guthrie let alone league. Crazy! He's a god! I don't think this whole selling my house to go off to be a musician is going to be as hard as I thought.

Simon
Vancouver,BC
A Whole Mess of Flys and I Love Them ALL!!!!!
 

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Offline danjazzny

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« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2008, 01:06:39 PM »
quote:
I don't think this whole selling my house to go off to be a musician is going to be as hard as I thought.

                                                           Hey Simon, Best of Luck!! [:D]

'05 Mojo++'95 Deluxe++'98 Classic++'97 Alex Artist ++'99 Simonized Artist++'97 Custom Red Artist++Line 6 Amps
'99 Simonized Artist 4lbs13oz; '97 TransRed Artist 4lbs9oz; '00 TransCherry Classic w/SD's 5lbs3oz; Line 6 Vetta II

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Offline uburoibob

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« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2008, 07:15:53 PM »
Simon, I presume you are being tongue in cheek about selling the house to become a musician. I'd keep it, keep the job and keep the income on its way in as you start to apply the musicality portion to your playing. This is the part where musicians devote their entire lives to getting it. I'd give it at least a couple of years to allow your brain and ears to start to work with your exceptionally technically proficient hands. As long as I've been doing it, and there was a while spent playing really fast fusion, I still find that I am in the infant stages and am particularly humbled when I run across a bonafide prodigy, as I did about a year ago. A 15 year old kid who had all of the Ted Greene stuff down cold. You don't run into them every day, but when you do, you are reminded that the words "gifted" and "genius" are WAY overused in our society. His musicality was on par with Mozart's. If you can apply the same discipline you've brought to speed and precision to WHAT you are playing, you'll be amazing. Now, quit reading forum posts and start studying!

Bob

2001 Parker Fly Single 2 Silver  â€¢ 1997 Parker Fly Concert Burnt Butterscotch  â€¢  1999 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail Butterscotch  â€¢  1998 Fly Classic in Transparent Dark Blue  â€¢  1998 Fly Classic in Cherry Red with DiBurro Roland Mod •  http://bobmartin1111.com
1999 Parker Fly Artist Custom Hardtail Butterscotch -   2000 Fly Standard Classic in Cherry Red - http://bobmartin1111.com

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Offline laughinglarry

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« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2008, 03:47:26 PM »
Simon,

I think you need to plan out a systematic approach to making music a full-time job.  I've only seen your YouTube video's, so I don't know what kind of experience you have.  Have you ever been in a band?  Have you played in front of an audience with any regularity?

I know that it takes a lot of networking skills in order to get signed to a label.  And these days a label contract isn't necessarily the gateway to fame, fortune, success, or riches.  (I have a buddy that was signed to Favored Nations, and was dropped for not being able to get to "the next level".  He had product, but no ability to get it into widespread distribution.)

From everything that I've read on the subject (which is considerable, since I'm actively promoting my band) you need to make a big splash regionally first.  I've mentioned before that I'm in awe at the amount of talent in Vancouver.  At least you've got a healthy music scene.  You need to become a big fish in that pond as a starter.

I don't doubt that you'll find success, but I think you will need to take a measured approach.  Put a band together.  Hone your chops in front of live audiences.  Once you're tight, get tighter.  Then see if you can get slots opening for the kind of acts that you admire.

Good luck!  (And remember that Jason Davis, Vince Genella, Dave Martone, and German Schauss all still check in here from time to time.  Don't go getting a swollen head and forget about your forum buddies! [:p][;)])

Larry

2000 Fly Deluxe Single 2, 2000 Fly Stealth, '97 Fly Deluxe (with GK-2A), '07 Steinberger GM-7TA, '89 Strat Plus, '92 Les Paul Custom, Ibanez Silver Series (Strat), Epiphone Dot, '65 Mustang, Yamaha BB3000AF, Peavey Foundation, Hamer Cruisebass
http://www.myspace.com/larrysmithmusic
www.myspace.com/karmagenerator

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Offline simonlock

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« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2008, 07:33:28 PM »
Haha! Nope I'll always be a beginner at heart. I really admire the guys with the humility and the chops. I'm not near enough to be compared to those dudes anyway. My goal though is to have the opportunity to work with them in the future.

Simon
Vancouver,BC
A Whole Mess of Flys and I Love Them ALL!!!!!