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Author Topic: .008s  (Read 11490 times)

Offline prjacobs

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.008s
« on: January 25, 2009, 10:35:31 AM »
Yes, I'm a wimp, but I had a specific need and threw a set of .008 - .038s on my/my son's classic.  I'm happy to report that the guitar plays in tune, which can be very problematic with such thin strings. In fact, it plays more in tune than any other guitar I've ever tried this on, which I'm sure is no surprise to you all. Maybe even better than my beloved 64 SG Special, which I bought new, still have, and which started my career[:)]
« Last Edit: January 25, 2009, 10:36:10 AM by prjacobs »
 

.008s

Offline Bill

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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2009, 12:26:56 PM »
Good to know. Thanks pr.

I just pulled my Deluxe out after 4 months in the case. Still in perfect tune. Then I did the same with the Mojo. Same story. I forget to check my main guitar, the Artist. Always in tune too.

These are amazing guitars.

I'm doing a crude tone comarison between them which I will post later for what its worth.

A few Flys in my soup
A few Flys in my soup

.008s

Offline danjazzny

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.008s
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2009, 12:34:12 PM »
Hey Paul, I've thought about trying a set of 8's. Are you using a #9 spring? [8D]

'97 Alex Artist ; '99 Simonized Artist; '97 Custom Red Artist; '98 Custom Tobacco Artist (Hardtail); '96 Dayn Deluxe (Hardtail); Line6 Flextone 3 Amp++SpiderValve 212 Amp++Fishman Loudbox Pro 100 Acoustic Amp
'99 Simonized Artist 4lbs13oz; '97 TransRed Artist 4lbs9oz; '00 TransCherry Classic w/SD's 5lbs3oz; Line 6 Vetta II

.008s

Offline prjacobs

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.008s
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2009, 02:14:22 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by danjazzny

Hey Paul, I've thought about trying a set of 8's. Are you using a #9 spring? [8D]




Yes, I'm using the 9 spring. I bought this guitar used on the forum and it came with a 9 and 10.... I don't really have any great technical knowledge, but it's playing great. The challenge with 8s can be making sure that you don't press too hard,which can make your pitch sharp. But maybe because of the Parker fret size, it feels very natural to my playing. Then again, I spent almost 20 years playing with 8s...
 

.008s

Offline Strandwolf

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.008s
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2009, 05:26:53 PM »
I've been meaning to get around to this topic--am
hardly ready to do so yet, but I never am fully ready for anything, so what the...heck.

Two big issues here are tone and playability (macho factor entering bigtime here).

I had a list once of players that played with rubber bands aka spaghetti strings. The main reasons, I assume, were bendability, including up full step to vibrato ease, and single note speed enhancement.

List attendees included, perhaps, Hendrix and Guy. "Regular" electric strings back in the way even had wound G strings as a matter of course (anyone still use 'em?).

I think I recall reading an interview with Mike Bloomfield in which he admitted to experimenting with banjo strings for the high 'E'...do those go as light as .0075 or something?

Back in the mid and late '60s, guitar fretboard/nut/bridge setups were generally in a more primitive state, with knowledge but scarce and unfounded rumors rife pertaining to the right way to go on the various perameters. Lighter guages made chording as well as single note lead a more pleasant affair as far as the hand(s) were concerned, for sure! Since then, much has been truly learned re setups, but BS still gets promulgated, from my limited point of view, anyway.

As for me, a "skinny top, heavy bottom" seems to be the way.
Say: 008, 010, 013, 022.... Wimpsville, yeah, but that sweet vibrato is thereby accessible to my dainty fingers and wrist. Tone I can finagle from the pickups, pedals, and amp.

(and anyone gets in my face about it...just might feel the tap of carbon fiber-clad basswood on skull....[}:)] )
Parkers: Pick, cap, T-shirt, clock, and other assorted accouterments

.008s

Offline prjacobs

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.008s
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2009, 07:24:34 PM »
The big advantage of playing with extra light strings is that you can play faster and if you're not a great picker, you can use your left hand more.  There's also a lot less left hand fatigue, since they're much easier to play. I used extra light strings for all of the strings, because I played solos using the entire guitar and I wanted the same advantage I had on the high strings, when playing on the low strings.  I played in a power trio and did a bit of everything. This setup is best for lead guitarists, not rhythm players.  I also used to play a lot with my fingers and light strings were much easier on my right hand.  Yes, many guitarists had a prejudice against players who used light gauge strings, but I crushed them all! [:)]  I used an Ampeg SVT with 2 cabinets, 8 - 10" speakers in cabinet - and my trusty Bosstone fuzz, which plugged right into my guitar jack:)  I  varied pick thickness, but usually found that extra light or light picks were best, because the thin strings can break easier and the thin picks seemed to compliment my finger style the best. When I was playing with my fingers, I'd do things like play both lead parts of Alman Brothers songs such as Revival and Jessica at the same time.  It's not a wimpy sound, just make it real loud.  Like any other setup, you have to learn to control the tone, and find settings that give you the punch that you don't associate with light strings.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2009, 07:30:49 PM by prjacobs »
 

.008s

Offline Darter

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.008s
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2009, 10:01:00 PM »
1st off -- I also play a Bass, three 12-strings, acoustics, and 2 classicals with super high-tension strings. That being said...

Why would anyone apologize for using 8's? Anyone can beat a string to death (and every string from bass guitar to mandolin will go out of tune if pressed too hard) but caressing a string (what needs to be done on 8's) is like walking on rice paper. Be proud. There's a much greater range of tone that doesn't require a stone pick. LOL!!! Saying 8's aren't for rhythm guitar is like saying only a 6-string bass, is. It's all technique and thankfully, we all have our own. I play on 8's and only 8's (on my electrics) and pull off rhythm/jazz/Buckethead-ish heavy/clean finger-picking, and even... chunky ryhythm/strumming. Sheesh! why does the 10 club dislike the 8 club? Why, where, when did this club happen? "Yeah, the 9 club, they're okay and the 11 club, they're really cool but those 8's... What idiots." ...Why?

#1 concern with a Fly for me was the #9 spring and 8's. I was told (at a dealership) it wouldn't work. I was told that Ken said it wouldn't work. It does. Super sloppy trem like a Floyd Rose. It took almost 2-months to settle the truss and fine-tune everything but I couldn't be happier.

Can't we all just get along?
Electric--  94 Fly, PRS, 3 Ibanez - Thin, Iceman, EX, Schecter 7-String, Univox 12-String Archtop Hollow-Body, Brawley (Campfire Guitar), Kasuga Bass (57 Fender Copy)
Acoustic-- Ibanez 12-String, Harmony 12-String, Gretsch Synchromatic Archtop, Yamaha Classical, Giannini Classical, Washburn (Bird's Eye Maple), Martin Cutaway (Kit ...Unfinished) Mbox 2 Pro/Protools LE v8, Korg D32XD, 2 Adat/BRC, Mackie 1604, Tascam Portastudio 488, Roland (2) GR-09's,VG-8,VG-99, FC-300 (Controlled With 2 US-20's). 2 GK-2A, 2 GK-3. SR-16, 3 Digitech GSP-2101's. Buckets of pedals.  **Variety**

D.

.008s

Offline Titus Pullo

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.008s
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2009, 11:11:40 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Bill

Good to know. Thanks pr.

I just pulled my Deluxe out after 4 months in the case. Still in perfect tune. Then I did the same with the Mojo. Same story. I forget to check my main guitar, the Artist. Always in tune too.
A few Flys in my soup


I hear you, and raise you a few months! My injury (may be playing by summer!) has kept my guitars in cases/bags for a year now, and the Nitefly is always amazingly close to pitch. My Fenders drop a half to a full step across the board within a few months (room is allowed to adjust naturally to weather - no heat or A/C).

I take them out every so often and stare at them dolefully, strum them, tune them, and put them away for the next go-round.

Anyway, I'm going to watch this thread; I've been told to use the lightest gauge I can when I begin playing again.
--
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"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker


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Offline Strandwolf

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.008s
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2009, 03:58:26 PM »
I just replaced the .10 set on my Parker Single Cutaway with Ernie Ball extra lights; think they're .008, .011, .014, .020, ?, .032(?).

Frankly it makes the guitar much more enjoyable to play. I have small, relatively weak hands, and finger-vibratoing a 6 string C9 chord in 2nd position is fun when I'm in the swing but it does wear one down. Now if they'd only made the guitar 2 pounds lighter I'd play it 16 hours a day. Haven't played much yet on the new set (the local store was blowing their inventory out on these for $3.99, their electric string sets generally running $6 and over. I specifically went in for a set of .008s and popped for 3 whilst the gettin'
was good. Now, instead of pushing against a brick wall I'm frolicking in a bed of roses. I could have tuned the guitar down with the .010s but like to keep in standard tuning for ear training purposes, at least that's the concept. Also, in the rare event that I deign to play with other musical types, it's easier to glance over that their hopefully standard tuning and not have to convert. There's something confusing about 'standard tuning' in E flat when the fretboard has already been somewhat taken in the old memory bank.

The heavy string = thicker tone thing kind of got going with Stevie Ray Vaughan, I think. In his prime--late 20s, early 30s--he was allegedly running a .13 high E, though it was tuned down a half step in most cases. Of course, heavier guage stringin' was commonplace up until the mid-1960s, but 2 step bends were not....
Parkers: Pick, cap, T-shirt, clock, and other assorted accouterments

.008s

Offline bembamboo

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.008s
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2009, 05:56:33 AM »
i used 8s back in the day and was glad to have discovered them.  slinkytops heavybottoms have always worked too, but now i use anything, any brand, tuning down to help singing makes for looser strings as said, and use monsters down to tens, but came across some wisdom, maybe from gary moore, the thin lizzie guy, (is that him, or is it gary burton), anyway?  he said " why encourage carpal tunel syndrom?  sounds like a good reason to me to play lighter strings.  slide playing favors heavy strings, though, i think.

.008s

Offline Yoyo

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.008s
« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2009, 06:05:49 AM »
Over the years I've come down from 11's through 10's to 9's and contrary to the accepted wisdom I prefer the sound of lighter strings. More twang and a nice brilliance of tone.
The only thing that exists is this moment now.

.008s

Offline David Tomkins

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.008s
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2009, 11:42:15 AM »
how do folks find the 008s hold up with regard to breakage?
2005 Green Quilted Maple Custom Mojo signed by Steve Vai, 2006 Parker Fly T-Shirt, 2006 Parker Fly Baseball Cap.  A triple-whammy of Parker goodness!!

.008s

Offline prjacobs

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.008s
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2009, 04:34:41 PM »
You have to get used to playing with them, but once you do, they should last as long as any other string.  .008 - .038 was my setup.
 

.008s

Offline Darter

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.008s
« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2009, 11:25:41 AM »
If you play with a heavy hand, you will break 8's easier. Try turning up and playing softer. There are tones in 8's If played softly that you won't find in heavier gauges. It's preference and 9-12's are okay. They chew up my fingers and knock my guitar's around whereas 8's are just ... cream. Just like owning a Parker, it's preference and diversity from the norm.
Good luck to you.
Electric--  94 Fly, PRS, 3 Ibanez - Thin, Iceman, EX, Schecter 7-String, Univox 12-String Archtop Hollow-Body, Brawley (Campfire Guitar), Kasuga Bass (57 Fender Copy)
Acoustic-- Ibanez 12-String, Harmony 12-String, Gretsch Synchromatic Archtop, Yamaha Classical, Giannini Classical, Washburn (Bird's Eye Maple), Martin Cutaway (Kit ...Unfinished) Mbox 2 Pro/Protools LE v8, Korg D32XD, 2 Adat/BRC, Mackie 1604, Tascam Portastudio 488, Roland (2) GR-09's,VG-8,VG-99, FC-300 (Controlled With 2 US-20's). 2 GK-2A, 2 GK-3. SR-16, 3 Digitech GSP-2101's. Buckets of pedals.  **Variety**

D.

.008s

Offline Willie K

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.008s
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2009, 03:48:52 AM »
You guys made me remember my old days when playing a les paul and one day I changed the .009 strings for the .008's and after that I took great delight in playing that guitar. Now...I have a Nitefly SA...the best I've ever owned. I'm very tempted to put .008's on it, my question is...will I have to adjust something else to avoid problems with intonation? I don't play hard... so finding the right technique is not a problem.
Regards...

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