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Author Topic: .008s  (Read 11501 times)

Offline Darter

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.008s
« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2009, 01:22:00 AM »
Not if you take the time to set it up properly.
Electric--  94 Fly, PRS, 3 Ibanez - Thin, Iceman, EX, Schecter 7-String, Univox 12-String Archtop Hollow-Body, Brawley (Campfire Guitar), Kasuga Bass (57 Fender Copy)
Acoustic-- Ibanez 12-String, Harmony 12-String, Gretsch Synchromatic Archtop, Yamaha Classical, Giannini Classical, Washburn (Bird's Eye Maple), Martin Cutaway (Kit ...Unfinished) Mbox 2 Pro/Protools LE v8, Korg D32XD, 2 Adat/BRC, Mackie 1604, Tascam Portastudio 488, Roland (2) GR-09's,VG-8,VG-99, FC-300 (Controlled With 2 US-20's). 2 GK-2A, 2 GK-3. SR-16, 3 Digitech GSP-2101's. Buckets of pedals.  **Variety**

D.

.008s

Offline PatricBrown

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.008s
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2010, 06:20:07 PM »
Back in the '60's, early '70's too probably, I used 8's. I'm pretty married to 9's now; I like the Fender 150xl 9-40(instead of 42, and you get a 15 for your g, which is nice.) Shawn Lane used 8's, AFIK.
At Berklee, in '72, I remember hearing of how Mick Goodrick was using a 6 for an e string. Never met him,,was just a rumor I heard. Was wondering where he found one.

http://www.myspace.com/patrickronaldbrown

2000 Fly Stealth Gray Hard Tail, 2000 Reverend Slingshot, THD Univalvew/one12 Avatar Bottom(Eminence Private Jack), Traynor YCV20WR, Ableton Suite 8, various & assorted other acoustic & electric, Home Studio

It is better to know than to believe.

Live is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're going to get.
http://www.myspace.com/patrickronaldbrown

2000 Fly Stealth Gray Hard Tail, 2000 Reverend Slingshot, THD Univalvew/one12 Avatar Bottom(Eminence Private Jack), Traynor YCV20WR, Ableton Suite 8, various & assorted other acoustic & electric, Home Studio

It is better to know than to believe.

Live is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're going to get.

.008s

Offline billy

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.008s
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2010, 08:56:45 AM »
haters gonna hate [}:)]


I remember reading a Kevin Dubrow interview about Randy Rhoads switching to 10s to keep his LP in tune, and then he liked the tone better (Dubrow tried to take credit for the switch and amp selection too- ridiculous).  Probably more likely that Leslie West was using them, Randy was a big fan. About that same time I also read about Uli Roth claiming that he got a better tone with 10s and higher action.  

So I tried 10s and ended up using them for quite some time.  I switched back to 9s though when I couldn't get a set of 10s one day and then just didn't want to bother with readjusting the floyd all over again to go back to 10s.  Felt positively muscle bound for a little while with the 9s...

Anyway, I think string gauge does affect how much the guitar resonates/vibrates but there's a lot of other variables.  Some guitars might work better with lighter/heavier gauges than others, so I'm leery of over generalizing here.

We've seen people making great music with two strings, and we've got people tuning 5 steps down with 13s so if you like what you're getting out of the guitar, isn't that really the point?  Doesn't much matter to most of the audience, if there is one, how you get there.

That said, information exchange is wonderful since dialogs like this one can hopefully help someone else get to a place where they like what's coming out of their guitar that much more.  Maybe that means switching to 8s...[:D]

Billy


*play it like you mean  it...*
Billy

[always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question.  e. e. cummings]

.008s

Offline PatricBrown

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.008s
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2010, 10:15:16 AM »
One thing about 9's that I like is that they seem to have a natural compression built into them. 10's can come punching out of the speakers awfully hard(my right ear has a hole in the ear drum, so I can be painfully aware of this,,hear fine with it,,just can't skin dive,,,need to keep water out of it. and it makes me not want to turn up amps too loud, and to hate loud drummers), and 9's seem to take the pick hit, then swell out more a nano second later.

I was perusing for source of info about numbers, and came upon a poll on some guitar forum(there are so many guitar forums), and it came out, probably as a fairly accurate overall sampling, to some 53/54 % using 10's, 34/35% using 9's, 8 or so % using 11's, and the rest, the other odd gauges, 8's included in this. Al DiMeola uses 9's, I was reading in GP last night.

http://www.myspace.com/patrickronaldbrown

2000 Fly Stealth Gray Hard Tail, 2000 Reverend Slingshot, THD Univalvew/one12 Avatar Bottom(Eminence Private Jack), Traynor YCV20WR, Ableton Suite 8, various & assorted other acoustic & electric, Home Studio

It is better to know than to believe.

Live is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're going to get.
http://www.myspace.com/patrickronaldbrown

2000 Fly Stealth Gray Hard Tail, 2000 Reverend Slingshot, THD Univalvew/one12 Avatar Bottom(Eminence Private Jack), Traynor YCV20WR, Ableton Suite 8, various & assorted other acoustic & electric, Home Studio

It is better to know than to believe.

Live is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're going to get.

.008s

Offline Strandwolf

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.008s
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2010, 08:48:58 PM »
from the favorite guitarists section, Travis Wammack relates his secret weapon back in the early and mid-1960s.


Travis Wammack- Scratchy Besides being able to pick his Gibson 335 at close to the speed of light, just what was the secret to Memphis guitar genius Travis Wammack’s sound? “I used A tenor banjo strings for my G string,” says Wammack, “I’d go into clubs and look at the picker’s guitar and if he didn’t have an unwound third string I knew I could burn him up. I could get the stretchy sound and lay some funk on him.”
Parkers: Pick, cap, T-shirt, clock, and other assorted accouterments

.008s

Offline lucgravely

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.008s
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2010, 09:12:21 PM »
Standwolf, I had a friend who always used wound G strings. He said he "lived" for wound G strings. I'm not sure if he liked the feel of the wound strings or the tone, but he loved that wound G.

I personally use 10s because of the way they feel. When I bend 9s in the middle of the neck I tend to bend 1 1/4 step up making me have to consciously not over bend. With 10s I bend 1 step up every time. I've also grown attached to the "stiff" feel of 10s over the "slinky" feeling of 9s.

Also keep in mind the thicker the strings require more tension to tune to standard. I used 8s years ago and besides over bending, they are so loose you have to press down lighter. Which is good and bad just according to your playing style. I tend to press down a little too hard for 8s. Oh, and I did break 8s on the high E string. Too thin for my aggressiveness.
Luc Gravely
Parker Fly Mojo Singlecut
Parker NiteFly NV1
Mesa/Boogie Mark I
1966 Fender BandMaster
A few pedals...

.008s

Offline prjacobs

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.008s
« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2010, 07:22:09 AM »
In the 60s, Hendrix, Clapton, Beck and Page all copied American blues guitarists, who used a tenor banjo string for their E and and moved the E down to the B string, etc.  â€œHendrix described the setup on his Strat around 1967 as ‘Fender light-gauge strings, using a regular E-string for the B and sometimes a tenor A-string for a [high] E to get my kind of sound on the Stratocaster. put the strings on with a slightly higher [action] so they can ring longer.’ This particular string-swapping routine was a popular modification at the time. It resulted in a set of stings as light as possible, aiding not only the string bending but also finger vibrato. On a later guitar, his black Strat, the surviving strings indicate he preferred ‘light’ gauges, .009" to .038".”

My friend was in a small club with Hendrix when he broke a string and he took an E string from him and used it as a B.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2010, 07:24:42 AM by prjacobs »
 

.008s

Offline Patzag

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.008s
« Reply #22 on: September 13, 2010, 09:40:28 AM »
I experimented with pretty much everything from 8 to 11, with the 11 experiment being the shortest lived.  i definitely felt a lot of tonal differences between the gauges with 10's being, for me, the most pleasing, but also too hard to play for me.  (I was raised on 8's).
I eventually found the best compromise between the tone I liked and the slinkyness of the strings with D'addarios 0095s.  They're just a touch harder than 9's and still playable for me.  
I never paid much mind to who plays what. Just what I could play and sounded good to me.

Trans-blue Mojo 2006, Pearl White Custom Dragonfly HSH 2010
Teal Fly Classic 1998 / White Deluxe Hard Tail 1994 /Axe FX II

.008s

Offline lucgravely

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.008s
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2010, 02:55:36 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by Patzag

I experimented with pretty much everything from 8 to 11, with the 11 experiment being the shortest lived.  i definitely felt a lot of tonal differences between the gauges with 10's being, for me, the most pleasing, but also too hard to play for me.  (I was raised on 8's).
I eventually found the best compromise between the tone I liked and the slinkyness of the strings with D'addarios 0095s.  They're just a touch harder than 9's and still playable for me.  
I never paid much mind to who plays what. Just what I could play and sounded good to me.

Trans-blue Mojo 2006, Pearl White Custom Dragonfly HSH 2010



+1

Play what works best for you. I like 10-52s so that's what I play.
Luc Gravely
Parker Fly Mojo Singlecut
Parker NiteFly NV1
Mesa/Boogie Mark I
1966 Fender BandMaster
A few pedals...

.008s

Offline prjacobs

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.008s
« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2010, 04:21:36 PM »
Well... It had been a while and I just dusted off my Classic, (mostly used by my son)... And with .008 - .038s, it plays great. What really stands out about it is how much in tune it is. No other guitar I have, plays as in tune with .008s! I'd forgotten how good this guitar is:)... Now, I'll continue to get down with my bad self. Happy Holidays.
 

.008s

Offline bembamboo

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.008s
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2012, 01:11:12 AM »
prj-i too started with an sg new, after a decca and then a vox strat for a few years, in 1969.  wish i still had the sg though it was surely no 64!

Re: .008s

Offline prjacobs

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Re: .008s
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2012, 11:31:55 AM »
You guys made me remember my old days when playing a les paul and one day I changed the .009 strings for the .008's and after that I took great delight in playing that guitar. Now...I have a Nitefly SA...the best I've ever owned. I'm very tempted to put .008's on it, my question is...will I have to adjust something else to avoid problems with intonation? I don't play hard... so finding the right technique is not a problem.
Regards...

Nitefly SA (red)
P-42
Guitar Rig 3
Ableton Live 7

I think you'd find that your Parker will be more in tune than any other axe with .008s.
 

Re: .008s

Offline bembamboo

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Re: .008s
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2013, 06:47:43 PM »
so pr, howz your hearing?  didja use bass speakers in the svt?  i was using one with a 68 or 69 sg in stones, beatles, cream days, but by the time jessica came around it was les paul, mainly and a v4. had given up on .008s by then but they really helped my early bending and vibrato "while my guitar gently weeps" technique.  and we have all heard the rev. billy g. uses them .008s in our old age!

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Offline bembamboo

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Re: .008s
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2013, 06:51:54 PM »
pbrown-how u like yer univalve?

Re: .008s

Offline prjacobs

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Re: .008s
« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2013, 08:26:20 PM »
so pr, howz your hearing?  didja use bass speakers in the svt?  i was using one with a 68 or 69 sg in stones, beatles, cream days, but by the time jessica came around it was les paul, mainly and a v4. had given up on .008s by then but they really helped my early bending and vibrato "while my guitar gently weeps" technique.  and we have all heard the rev. billy g. uses them .008s in our old age!

Yes, I used the cabinets just as they came with 8 X 10" bass speakers in each one. The cabinets and amp weighed 400 lbs! I could never play without my Bosstone Fuzztone that plugged directly into my guitar! My hearing in those days was more effected by the crash cymbal than anything else. I played in a power trio and we played small clubs. In the early Meatloaf days, before master volumes, I played only piano and never wanted or needed any guitars in my monitor. Back then, everyone was going out with the new Yamaha electric piano - the one with strings. As a result, Meatloaf's organization was able to rent a Steinway concert grand for $100/week and we had a Helpinstill (sp?) pickup system in it. Those high notes on the piano are much more painful than the guitars. I was so enamored of playing huge stadiums, that at first I didn't want to use earplugs. That quickly changed....
I actually found that subbing for the Hammond B3 player in Tommy James' band was more damaging. Tommy's guitar is crushingly loud and he uses wedges, not an in ear system. At one gig, I had a earplug go deep into my ear and get stuck. Not pretty. My wife had to take it out with tweezers after the set.
These days I'm playing a '60 Les Paul SG with .008s. It takes some finesse to keep it in tune, but it kills! To drop yet another name :) , Roy Buchanan gave it to me. I'd told him that I grew up playing an SG and at one gig he handed me the case and said.... This is a present for you. He was a great guy as well as a great player!