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Author Topic: US Marine Corps  (Read 3318 times)

Offline 4mula97

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« on: May 12, 2009, 02:40:33 PM »
I wanted to start a discussion about anyones experiences in the military.  I wanted to start it here, because i know ther are alot of musicians who were prior military.  and mostly i wanted to see what you guys think about the experiences gained in leadership and managment, versus the actual job performed every day.  my job is hydraulic and structures, now i am solely responsible for quality and training.  

i have spent nine years in the Corps, and gained more knowledge and experince as a manager than a mechanic.  any one else agree or disagree and why?  and after september this year i'll be looking for work.  big changes comming up for me.

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Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2009, 04:18:17 PM »
Due to a pronounced perhaps pathological antipathy toward authority figures and for yet more 'reasons' I deemed myself unfit for the military life, as it were. Others agreed, most notably my draft board.

I guess, though, that I fought on the home front. Berkeley, 1967 to 1971. Tally ho....[8D]

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Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2009, 04:22:49 PM »
Oops, my above post was primarily to run my new siggy line. I previewed it but didn't submit it, but now I have, and to stunning effect I might add.[:)]

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Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2009, 04:27:05 PM »
Bigger is better. So is lighter. The Bumblebee flies!

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Offline 4mula97

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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2009, 05:31:48 PM »
okay, anyone else?

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Offline tildeslash

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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2009, 09:54:45 PM »
Semper Fi - turned my life around and I did finally get a clue.
6 years - miss it - just the good times.
If you've been in it - you know what I just said.

Leadership by example is what I show at work.

 

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Offline 4mula97

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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2009, 10:32:21 PM »
semper fidelis

there are parts i will miss and parts i wont

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Offline mojotron

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« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2009, 12:49:45 AM »
I spent 6 years in the Navy...

I was an electronics tech in the USN - the last couple of years in the Navy I was filling in as the night shift work center supervisor, I got a BSEE degree after I got out and have been working in the computer design industry for the last 15 years. I got some management experiences that really helped me when I got out. Actually, most of the technical skills people learn in the military are not all that applicable to the technical skills for a job on the outside. At least there will likely be a couple years of learning new things once you get out. Also, outside, the whole focus is on efficiency and making a buck: So, if the job gets done in a way that brings in money for the company - that's all that matters. My experience in the military is that there was a lot of effort put into getting people to do a 'good' job - take pride in your work, but in the civilian world if someone does not do a 'great' job they are going to be out of a job fast and no one really cares if you have pride in your work. So you run into a lot of people that hate their jobs, but can do their job really really well.

I don't think my military leadership and/or management background really came into use until I got to a pretty senior engineering level. About 5 years ago I went into engineering management and now I leverage that experience every day. I mean, once you have learned to handle lightly trained people who are making little money and have to put up with a lot and get them to do a good job in the military - it's a piece of cake to get highly compensated/motivated people to do a great job. That makes you look like great, but it depends on how well you have used the military opportunities to learn how to master leadership/management without coercion. Coercive tactics don't work for long in the civilian world, and leadership is all about setting the strategic objective and getting everyone aligned to that mission and not being dependent on others agreement. Sometimes that is leading by example sometimes it's having faith in yourself and putting lipstick on a pig while you figure out how to keep everyone else employed long enough to get to the next contract...

I'm not sure if the military is for all people, but it did wonders for me: I was a laid-back underachiever before I got in, when I got out I had a plan for everything I did and I was very committed to archiving those goals; having lived in a situation where my life was controlled in the military - since I've gotten my freedom I've treated it with a lot of respect and tried to do the most with it: That has driven me to be pretty successful in all the things I've done after I got out.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2009, 12:53:20 AM by mojotron »
 

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Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2009, 01:44:41 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by mojotron

I spent 6 years in the Navy...

I'm not sure if the military is for all people, but it did wonders for me: I was a laid-back underachiever before I got in, when I got out I had a plan for everything I did and I was very committed to archiving those goals; having lived in a situation where my life was controlled in the military - since I've gotten my freedom I've treated it with a lot of respect and tried to do the most with it: That has driven me to be pretty successful in all the things I've done after I got out.


All your experiences except the underachiever part have eluded me. I squeaked out of college with a B.A. in Psych at the end of 1971, and got a pre-induction physical notice. My draft lottery number was 137--they reached 125. Lots of Americans were dying far away for a cause that didn't register with me. I went to the physical, in Oakland, and was in a group of a dozen like me except they weren't. One guy, a colossal yokel, went on and on about how his next door neighbor let him use his Ferrari and he drove at up the highway at 200mph. As a somewhat sophisticated sports car buff, I knew this was BS in several respects, and envisioned several years of such tripe being slung in the barracks. I knew I'd hate the sergeant and commissioned officers, but my fellow grunts as well? It was too much to hack--I quit in advance. I got more than enough static in the civilian world, sensitive soul am I.... Good for nothing but music, primarily. Rockabilly, anybody? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZui8uWP4Ek



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Offline 4mula97

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« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2009, 03:08:25 AM »
i agree mojotron, there is so much that i see happening in the civilian world that baffles me.  it seems that people think too hard about things, when it really isnt that complicated.

i have been in the Corps for a few years now, and in a leadership billet for six years.  naturally the more time you spend managing, the less time you spend on your trade.  still i was pretty successful at my job, and enjoyed it tremendously.

i was one of the lucky ones, when i was twelve i saw a toy jet.  it was a harrier jump jet, ever since it has been my favorite jet and i joined the Corps and they gave me some wrenches and told me to go fix harriers.  i was jumping up and down because i was so excited.

now, a few years later, i have lead deployments to afghanistan, iraq (twice), and several other countries and states.  i have trained Marines, lead Marines, promoted Marines, and de-moted Marines.  i have launched aircraft under indirect fire from insurgents, and have been woken up from sleep by indirect fire from inconsiderate insurgents.

so when i start to tell prospective employers when they ask me if i can work under stress, motivate employees, train employees, reprimand employees, and deal with highly stressed out employees i can say yes.  

what i was getting at is that my time in the Corps has given me better abilities as a manager than a airframe mechanic.

strandwolf;  my father recieved a notice at the end, and his number as well was never officially called to report for training.  he later retired from GM as a salary mananger and always told me to never, NEVER, settle for what i was told that i should do.  i should make mistakes, learn from those mistakes, and make up my own mind.  he used to take me to his factories to meet the guys that worked for him, and that he worked with.  sometimes i think he did that so i would decide to NEVER work in a major production factory unless i owned the place.

any way, i am scared to death to leave the Corps, but it is my time to go.  i am also excited to get back into the civilian world and find some place to leave my mark.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HoICQ59n1Yo
this is pretty cool, during the time this video was made, i was on the USS Bataan.

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Offline Nefarius

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« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2009, 03:15:47 AM »
Strandwolf: "a pronounced perhaps pathological antipathy toward authority figures"

Same here. I guess this world could use a lot more like us. [:D]

Greetings...
Nef

He who joyfully marches to music rank and file, has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would surely suffice. This disgrace to civilization should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be a part of so base an action. It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder.
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Offline 4mula97

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« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2009, 03:19:37 AM »
quote:
Originally posted by Nefarius

Strandwolf: "a pronounced perhaps pathological antipathy toward authority figures"

Same here. I guess this world could use a lot more like us. [:D]

Greetings...
Nef

He who joyfully marches to music rank and file, has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would surely suffice. This disgrace to civilization should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be a part of so base an action. It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder.
- Albert Einstein






im guessing that you dont support the wars overseas?

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Offline BrainWorm

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« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2009, 03:24:31 AM »
There's nothing better than being shot at and missed, and almost nothing worse than thinking about the next time. Oh yes, when you're trying to get some sleep and the rats are crawling up over you, heading for your face, they have soft warm feet that feel good until you realize what they are up to. Those soft warm feet say sleep on my dear, sleep on.

"Brainverms come crawling and creeping and eat you when you're sleeping."
"Brainverms come crawling and creeping and eat you when you're sleeping."

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Offline 4mula97

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« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2009, 04:05:33 AM »
not sure what you mean by "the rats", however, i didnt like getting shot at 2003, even less in 2004, and not at all in 2008.  

two days before i left kandahar i was standing at an entry control point, a rocket landed about 40 yards from me and a buddy.  my buddy got a purple heart.

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Offline Strandwolf

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« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2009, 09:56:58 AM »
Marines! Ya gotta love 'em. I worked at a small business with a little character of Philippines extraction who was in the Marines reserves and he was a lot of fun. Caesar was/is I hope--his first name.
Could be hell on wheels. He told me that he spent the weekend down at Hunter Liggett Military Reservation. They had two platoons and split up and tracked each other down. That's about all he said. I pried out of him that his guys wiped their opponents out, 19 to nothing. Modest chap.

He had some yarns: his gunny said, okay now lissen up, got everyone's attn, then rubbed his nose, and said, gdarn I got this mofo'in booger messin' with me.
One of this guy's friends called him up at the beginning of Gulf War One and had been watching the TV news and there'd been a flag burning demo up in Berkeley. He shouted to Caesar over the phone, "They're burning the "mothereffing flag, man, we gotta go up there and kick their asses!!!!" Of course he went with him but it was all over by then.
I try not to confuse loyalty with honor.

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