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Offline simonlock

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« on: July 11, 2009, 10:37:22 AM »
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« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 06:39:52 PM by simonlock »
 

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Offline Titus Pullo

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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2009, 10:38:59 AM »
Now I ___really____ hate you!
[:)]


EDIT: Are these plank or quarter sawn?

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« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 10:40:14 AM by Titus Pullo »
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Offline cy2989

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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2009, 10:42:14 AM »
that one is obviously slab cut.  Beautiful though.  I think some Jerome Little knobs are in order for that guitar.

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Offline Titus Pullo

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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2009, 10:54:48 AM »
I'm a bit of a wood novice; how can you tell without seeing the sides?

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"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker

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Offline danjazzny

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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2009, 12:31:53 PM »
Another outstanding Fly Simon! [:D][8D]

'97 Alex Artist ; '99 Simonized Artist; '97 Custom Red Artist; '98 Custom Tobacco Artist (Hardtail); '96 Dayn Deluxe (Hardtail); Line6 Flextone 3 Amp; Line 6 Vetta II Amp
'99 Simonized Artist 4lbs13oz; '97 TransRed Artist 4lbs9oz; '00 TransCherry Classic w/SD's 5lbs3oz; Line 6 Vetta II

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Offline Marco76

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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2009, 12:35:24 PM »
Thanks for the photos; #20 is now in the Guide. Whenever possible, I'd like to include the serial number and even the weight. Could you provide these? Do you know how many were in the series altogether?
Marco

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Offline cy2989

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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2009, 12:41:41 PM »
Titus,

If the billet was quarter sawn you would see annual rings that were straight, like you see in the spruce top of an acoustic guitar or even an Artist or a Bronze.  Since in Simon's guitar you see the rings going in sort of waves that would be slab cut. If I could draw a little picture it would be easy to see. My Bastogne Fly is slab cut too.



Here we go....

« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 01:14:08 PM by cy2989 »

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Offline Titus Pullo

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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2009, 01:11:03 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by cy2989

Titus,

If the billet was quarter sawn you would see annual rings that were straight, like you see in the spruce top of an acoustic guitar or even an Artist or a Bronze.




Thanks for the info.

Like this?



--
"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker

--
"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker


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Offline cy2989

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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2009, 01:19:05 PM »
Yes, that is slab but.  Sometimes slab but is more attractive due to the crazy things the grain does.  In a soundboard, like an acoustic top, you don't want that because quarter cut gives the greatest stiffness and stability.  A slab cut acoustic top would not vibrate symetrically and might even warp in strange ways over time.  It's not an issue for solid body electrics though as the body is so thick.

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Offline Titus Pullo

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« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2009, 01:20:17 PM »
quote:
Originally posted by cy2989

Yes, that is slab but.  


That's odd, because it's a shot of a Tulipwood LE!

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"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker

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"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker


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Offline cy2989

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« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2009, 01:29:46 PM »
Not all the Tulipwoods were quarter sawn.  I had one that was almost quarter sawn.  It was number 9 if I remember.  Your picture is absolutely slab cut.



See the difference?
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 01:33:03 PM by cy2989 »

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Offline Titus Pullo

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« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2009, 01:34:33 PM »
Hmm ... Mark F. would swear differently (#7). It's almost as if it's half and half - half the grain is straight up and down, while the other has some figuring.

--
"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker

--
"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker


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Offline cy2989

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« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2009, 01:37:32 PM »
I used to be a violin maker.  I know about wood and how it is cut for instrument making.  With all due respect to Mark F, your picture is slab cut.

Even mine, with the grain looking so straight, was not perfectly quarter cut.  If you looked at the end grain you would see it was running at a severe slant.  Good quarter cut boards are perfectly perpendicular.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 01:39:38 PM by cy2989 »

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Offline Titus Pullo

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« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2009, 01:42:03 PM »
Anyway, the way it was explained to me, the Q-sawn wood boards are taken from a log that's been cut into quarter chunks and the billets are taken from those quarter cuts.

As one travels up and around the quarter chunk, the grain will change from completely straight lines to a mixture of lines and figure.

You have to visualize the board representation in your graphic moving up and around (to obtain a large enough billet) the 1/4 chunk to see what was explained to me, but I'll ask again for clarification.

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"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker

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"If you subscribe to the Stew-Mac style you have to have a template to blow your nose." - Ken Parker


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Offline cy2989

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« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2009, 02:00:03 PM »
You're confusing figure, which is the flame that you see running perpendicular to the grain in curly maple or my Bastogne Fly, with the annual rings.  Quarter cut boards are taken just as my diagram shows.  The explanation you were given isn't correct.  Actually the logs are split into billets that from a cross section perspective look like a wedge or a piece of pie.  Those billets are then cut into smaller wedges so that the annual rings are perpendicular to the flat surface of the wood.  Two of the smaller wedges are planed and joined together to form a top.