The Parker Guitars Forum

Parker Lounge => ON MUSICIANSHIP AND THE ART OF PLAYING => Topic started by: mountaindewaddict on February 11, 2008, 10:39:56 PM

Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: mountaindewaddict on February 11, 2008, 10:39:56 PM
Just wondering - do you guys ever use a capo with your Parker?  The first time I ever saw that was the electric player for Sarah McLaughlin, and it gave it such a cool, chiming quality, I had to get one.  But then I wondered: What would I play to get those sounds if I didn't have the capo?  

So, do you think it helps or hinders creativity?  Does it expand your playing, or is it cheating (in that you don't have to force your hand to play chords that are challenging)?  What do you think?

MountainDewAddict (Casey)

Gear:
Parker P-44, Takamine G-Series,  Digitech GNX4, Korg AX3A, Crate Powerblock 150, Various other assorted pedals and gizmos

"Remember, if at first you don't succeed, you're doing it wrong."

God Bless!
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: Bill on February 11, 2008, 10:48:34 PM
How could it be cheating? I know what you mean but I dont think its weknness or cheating. Not even laziness as they are some trouble really.

Its just another tool. Like any tool they can be used well or overused/abused.

I now keep a Fly in C#, D, and two in E. I don't use the capo much anymore but if I played more I might.

I would like a Martin terse guitar tunes up but they are just expensive for what they are.

A few Flys in my soup
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: ckyvick on February 12, 2008, 02:33:14 AM
umm to get the chiming quality learn artificial harmonics, natural harmonics, pinch harmonics, and how to bar? ive never used a capo but i dont think it would hinder creativity, it just makes it easyer to play in a different key, right? the only thing that could hinder it useless is personal knowledge of music. perhaps some day ill play with a capo...by the way dave martone puts a scrunchie on his first fret to mute the strings, some would call that cheating~
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: guitarmanuk on February 12, 2008, 07:02:31 AM
I don't see it as cheating but we play one particular song that is great when played in D, as I can use a lot of open strings etc.  However, as we have brass, we have to play it in Eb.  I capo at the first fret and benfit from all the open strings again.  Job done.

David

1997 Parker Fly Classic transparent Teal Green

www.dancineasy.co.uk my wedding/function band
www.saxandguitar.co.uk my sax and guitar duo
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: Roland on February 12, 2008, 10:49:57 AM
It's not cheating any more than down-tuning or different string gauges are cheating.  Is it cheating for a horn player to have two instruments?

If you have two guitarist them it's essential that they use different voicings, and what better way than for one to use a capo.

Do I own a capo?  Yes, along with an ebow, three slides, and a dozen types of plectrum, none of which I use in the present band.

Roland
http://www.misbehavin.org/
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: simonlock on February 12, 2008, 11:32:45 AM
Doesn't folk traditionally use just open voicings and therefore use a capo to change keys? I think it's a great idea.

Simon
Vancouver,BC
2000 Fly Supreme
1998 Fly Supreme w/Jerome Little knobs
1999 Fly Artist w/Ken Parker sig and Jerome Little knobs
2006 Fly Nylon w/Jerome Little knobs
2002 Fly Classic Hardtail
2006 Fly Classic
2006 Fly Mojo
1999 Fly Deluxe w/Gen1s
2001 MidiFly
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: mountaindewaddict on February 12, 2008, 01:19:36 PM
Hey guys, I'm a little suprised at your reaction to the word "cheating."  Maybe I should clarify what I meant.  First, what I did NOT mean is this: using a tool/resource to change the tone of the notes (with that definition, string bending would be "cheating," and using effects, well, we won't go there).  

What I meant was, are you cheating yourself?  I use a capo pretty regularly, and I have begun to wonder if using the capo is stagnating my playing by allowing me to play in keys that I'm comfortable with and proficient in, rather than find new voicings for chords (I'm primarily a rhythm player).  Have any of you had that experience?

MountainDewAddict (Casey)

Gear:
Parker P-44, Takamine G-Series,  Digitech GNX4, Korg AX3A, Crate Powerblock 150, Various other assorted pedals and gizmos

"Remember, if at first you don't succeed, you're doing it wrong."

God Bless!
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: ckyvick on February 12, 2008, 11:30:13 PM
^The only thing its limiting is your fretboard dude, you put the capo on and you cant play any notes below it. So your losing notes?
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: Strandwolf on February 12, 2008, 11:42:06 PM
Some pluses, some minuses, sans dout.

Dig what a maestro accomplishes with the aid of one, solo commencing at about 1:50. I really doubt that there's superior guitaring in this fantastic genre that JLV handles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MriFbndNvnw
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: Paul Marossy on February 13, 2008, 02:58:30 AM
quote:
So, do you think it helps or hinders creativity? Does it expand your playing, or is it cheating (in that you don't have to force your hand to play chords that are challenging)? What do you think?


It think it can help with creativity as you can get some really neat sounds and overtones that you couldn't get otherwise.

However, I can't use a capo to play a song in a different key - I can't keep track of the chord shapes in my mind, I get confused too easily because the dots on the neck all shift and I just can't think about all that on the fly, my mind isn't fast enough when it comes to that. I guess I have just have had too many years of learning how to play the chords however you had to on the neck with whatever key you happen to be in. I suppose if I did it enough, I could overcome that. But I don't really play songs much, so it's kind of a moot point.

There are a couple of keys that are a real pain to play on the guitar, though, so a capo can come in handy sometimes - IF you can use it without tripping on yourself.

__/\\/\\__PJM__/\\/\\__
www.DIYguitarist.com
www.myspace.com/j201jams
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: David Tomkins on February 16, 2008, 02:49:42 AM
i i can't sing 90% of my fave songs because they are pitched to high.  so a capo is eesential to me - i wouldn't be able to sing songs without one.  consequently my bandmates keep trying to hide the capo.....  (well i could sing the songs, but i would have to re-learn all the songs with different chords.)
 If paul simon can use one on the 7th fret for "the sound of silence", then it's okay with me.

2005 Green Quilted Maple Custom Mojo, 2006 Parker Fly T-Shirt, 2006 Parker Fly Baseball Cap.  A triple-whammy of Parker goodness!!
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: prjacobs on March 11, 2008, 08:12:00 PM
Hi Casey,
In my opinion a capo expands possibilities.  It's like having lots of different guitars, of different sizes and tunings.  My original guitar heroes, the Beatles, used capos all of the time.  For example, "I'm Looking Through You," which is A flat, with the capo on the first fret.  Sometimes you just write a song in a certain key, because it just feels right there.  For that matter, playing with a capo on might inspire a different kind of playing and writing.  It can be very liberating.  For songs like "Nowhere Man," and "And Your Bird Can Sing," both in E major, they put the capo on the 2nd fret and the voicings are beautiful. "Here Comes The Sun," in A, is played with the capo on the 7th fret. All of George's fingerpicking sounds great with the capo.  
Like any other technique, playing with a capo takes practice; AND it's fun!

Best,
Paul
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: David Tomkins on March 13, 2008, 09:41:12 AM
'open strings chime and ring differently with a capo depending on the fret.  some placements sound good,, some sound amazing.  it's surprising the difference it can make.
12th fret = instant mandolin!

2005 Green Quilted Maple Custom Mojo, 2006 Parker Fly T-Shirt, 2006 Parker Fly Baseball Cap.  A triple-whammy of Parker goodness!!
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: Gorbyrev on March 13, 2008, 03:49:18 PM
I too was brought up on capo = lazy. But there are real benefits. I have been considering using one with the Fly. The only capo I'll buy though is the G7th capo. They are amazing. A guy came up with the idea of using a tiny ratchet to regulate pressure. Shubbs and all the other sprung capos produce a fixed pressure and given how sensitive the Fly can be around the 1st fret (ie. too much pressure makes the note sharp) you could really do with a varialble pressure capo. G7th for me then!
Only thing is can you imagine the neck dive using a capo on a Fly. The capo might weigh the same as the whole neck[:p]

'95 Fly Deluxe, Antique Gold
Rocktron Voodu Valve
Rocktron Velocity 120
Stereo heaven!
Title: Capos and electric guitars
Post by: captain_rusty on March 14, 2008, 06:54:26 AM
No complexes here - when the inversion requires it, I use a capo. I ALWAYS make things as easy as possible for myself [:D]

David
(http://rustyzone.free.fr/images/fly_cu-5cm.jpg)
2001 Fly Classic -> Ibanez WD7 wah -> Digidelay -> Trainwreck clone -> 1x12 Fane cabinets
Fly clip: http://rustyzone.free.fr/rusty_meltdown_44.mp3